Progress Report

The self-report below is organized according to the 24 transformations of the Agenda for Humanity. It is based on commitments pledged at the time of report submission. Click on the 'Expand' symbol to expand each section and read the reporting inputs by transformation.

1A
Demonstrate timely, coherent and decisive political leadership

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    This commitment is consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities, namely to “advance Canada’s values and interests through leadership and constructive engagement on key global issues with strategic partners, including at the UN and other multilateral institutions”. This includes increasing “support for peace operations, mediation, conflict-prevention, reconstruction and early recovery efforts.” (http://www.international.gc.ca/gac-amc/priorities-priorites.aspx?lang=eng).

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada helped to mobilize the UN General Assembly in October and December 2016 to hold special sessions on the situation in Syria, which included passing resolution A/71/L.39 calling for, inter alia, humanitarian access and compliance and accountability for violations of international humanitarian law. Canada also responded to issues of concern in many country-specific situations by issuing statements calling for full, safe and unhindered access, condemning incidents where humanitarian personnel and facilities have been attacked, recalling legal obligations and demanding accountability for violations.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is tracking progress through Global Affairs Canada annual reporting processes, as appropriate, as well as the reporting required by the terms and conditions of various programs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that humanitarian crises are becoming increasingly complex. Accountability for violations of international humanitarian law remains a significant challenge for the international community, and strong and consistent efforts are needed to ensure respect for, and compliance with, IHL.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to call for full, safe and unhindered humanitarian access, and speak out strongly against violations of international humanitarian law. Canada will also join the UN Group of Friends of Mediation and will engage with partner countries and organizations in order to identify opportunities where Canada could contribute positively to the prevention or resolution of conflict.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Demonstrate timely, coherent and decisive political leadership', what would it be

    The United Nations and its Member States need to strike a better balance between the considerable resources spent on peace operations and other tools to manage conflict, and those resources supporting conflict prevention and sustaining peace, particularly in the field.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1B - Act early

1B
Act early

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    This commitment is consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities, namely to “advance Canada’s values and interests through leadership and constructive engagement on key global issues with strategic partners, including at the UN and other multilateral institutions”. This includes increasing “support for peace operations, mediation, conflict-prevention, reconstruction and early recovery efforts.” (http://www.international.gc.ca/gac-amc/priorities-priorites.aspx?lang=eng). This commitment is also in line with the mandate of Canada’s Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs).

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada’s Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) was launched in August 2016. With a budget of CAD$ 450 million over three years, PSOPs has three core responsibilities: lead stabilization and fragile states policy; coordinate whole-of-government responses to conflicts and crises around the world; and support targeted stabilization programming in, and deployments to, fragile and conflict-affected states. In this regard, PSOPs works to strengthen the UN system in collaboration with key government partners. PSOPs is also funding a range of specific conflict prevention-related projects in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America totaling CAD$ 25.3 million.

    In April 2016, Canada endorsed the Stockholm Declaration on Addressing Fragility and Building Peace in a Changing World. This is a political re-commitment to the principles of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States, and affirmation that adhering to those principles is the best way for fragile and conflict-states to reach the 2030 Agenda.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is tracking progress through Global Affairs Canada annual reporting processes, as appropriate, as well as the reporting required by the terms and conditions of various programs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that crises are becoming increasingly complex. Conflict prevention requires a multi-pronged approach, and increased leadership is needed to act early to stop potential conflict situations from deteriorating.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to support a range of conflict prevention-related projects in 2017. Canada will also join the UN Group of Friends of Mediation and will engage with partner countries and organizations in order to identify opportunities where Canada could contribute positively to the prevention or resolution of conflict.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Act early', what would it be

    Interventions in preventing, managing, or resolving violent conflict should be integrated to the extent possible. While it is important to address immediate causes and drivers of conflict, deeper factors contributing to conflict must also be considered.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1C - Remain engaged and invest in stability

1C
Remain engaged and invest in stability

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    This commitment is consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities, namely to “advance Canada’s values and interests through leadership and constructive engagement on key global issues with strategic partners, including at the UN and other multilateral institutions”. This includes increasing “support for peace operations, mediation, conflict-prevention, reconstruction and early recovery efforts.” (http://www.international.gc.ca/gac-amc/priorities-priorites.aspx?lang=eng)

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada pledged up to 600 military personnel to be available for possible deployment to UN peace operations. Complementing this, Canada announced a 3-year, CAD$ 450 million Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) to work on stabilization and fragile state policy, support coordinated Canadian responses to conflicts and crises abroad, and design and deliver stabilization initiatives. This includes scaled-up police and civilian deployments. As an early contribution through PSOPs, Canada has sought to reinforce the capacity of the UN for conflict prevention and peacebuilding. In September 2016, Canada announced up to CAD$ 25 million over three years to help enhance UN capacities in conflict prevention, mediation, and peacebuilding. The new funding comprises CAD$ 10 million over three years to the UN Department of Political Affairs, and up to CAD$ 15 million over three years to the UN Peacebuilding Fund.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is tracking progress through Global Affairs Canada annual reporting processes, as appropriate, as well as the reporting required by the terms and conditions of various programs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that crises are becoming increasingly complex. Increased investments in stability need to be accompanied by political will and leadership to drive peace initiatives forward.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will host the 2017 UN Defence Ministerial on Peacekeeping as a means of continuing the work to support peace operations and make them more effective.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Remain engaged and invest in stability', what would it be

    Interventions in preventing, managing, or resolving violent conflict should be integrated to the extent possible. While it is important to address immediate causes and drivers of conflict, deeper factors contributing to conflict must also be considered.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5C - Invest in stability

1D
Develop solutions with and for people

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada supports commitments for enhanced accountability to people and communities affected by crisis, and endeavours to ensure that beneficiaries, including the most vulnerable, are engaged in all aspects of program design and delivery. At the WHS, Canada also announced that as part of its efforts to 'development solutions with and for people,' it will renew its National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security in 2017 (Canada's Action Plan sunset in 2016 after five years).

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada advocates for its implementing partners to make concrete efforts to include vulnerable populations - especially women and girls - in program design and implementation. Much of Canada’s funding is unearmarked or loosely earmarked (e.g. to the regional level), allowing organizations the flexibility to adapt specific program activities as needed based on consultations with beneficiaries.

    Canada has also been collecting information and recommendations for the renewed Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security through the report on Women, Peace and Security by a Parliamentary Committee, the Government's International Assistance Review, and the Defence Policy Review.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is working with its partners to track progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress in these commitments will be integrated into relevant reports by Global Affairs Canada, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Humanitarian and development actors must make increased and concerted efforts to ensure that the needs of those affected by crises are fully represented during all stages of program design and implementation.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Through participation in executive boards and as part of the Grand Bargain Gender Working Group, Canada will champion inclusiveness and advance efforts to better include beneficiary populations, especially women and girls, in program design and implementation.

    Canada also will ensure that the engagement and participation of beneficiaries, in particular women and girls, is fully integrated into the projects that Canada supports, and is revising its Humanitarian NGO Funding Guidelines to take this into account. In addition, Canada will develop and launch a renewed National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security Action Plan in 2017.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Develop solutions with and for people', what would it be

    Countries, international organizations and NGOs need to develop specific Action Plans on Women, Peace and Security to promote gender equality, the empowerment of women and girls, and protect their human rights in order to transform decision-making processes toward full inclusiveness.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3D - Empower and protect women and girls 4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems 5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

2A
Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada supports measures to tangibly enhance the protection of civilians, including through the financial commitments noted above.

    Canadian Armed Forces manuals and training reflect Canada's obligations under the Law of Armed Conflict, as well as the need to ensure that only military objectives are engaged and that harm to civilians and civilian property is minimized. In light of reports of illegitimate use of weapons by some states and non-state actors, Canada has been calling for all parties to armed conflict, including non-state actors, to uphold their obligations under international humanitarian law (IHL) and to protect civilians.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada endorsed the Kigali Principles in May 2016. In June 2016, Canada’s former Minister of Foreign Affairs delivered a speech to the UN Security Council on the protection of civilians in UN peacekeeping operations, in which he highlighted the implementation of the Kigali Principles as an important measure for Member States to undertake. Canada has participated in high-level meetings of parties to expand endorsement and improve implementation of the Kigali Principles.

    Canada has contributed staff planning, technical expertise, and lessons learned in support of UN bodies and NATO committees to develop military best practice and policy to enhance the protection of civilians. In December 2016, Canada hosted an event on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems. In addition, Canada recently signed on to the Safe Schools Declaration, and has participated in discussions about the use of explosive weapons in populated areas to strengthen compliance with IHL through education and accountability.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is tracking progress through Global Affairs Canada annual reporting processes, as appropriate, as well as the reporting required by the terms and conditions of various programs.

    In addition, Canada voluntarily submits responses on an annual basis to various international bodies on a wide range of issues (e.g. transparency on cluster munitions, transparency under the Ottawa Convention on Anti-Personnel Mines, military expenditure, implementation of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, etc.). Further, Canada participated in the review of UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs’ compilation of military practice and policy.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    New mission mandates should be clear and include robust protection of civilians provisions where appropriate, and they must be matched with the resources to carry them out effectively.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada is working on plans to provide training to troop- and police-contributing countries which will include elements on protection of civilians. Canadian personnel will also continue to receive training on protection of civilians. Any Canadian military personnel deployed will do so with appropriate training, capabilities and rules of engagement.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities', what would it be

    The protection of civilians is key to most peace operations mandates. Contributing states should be upfront about any limitations on their personnel’s ability to carry out mandates as directed by the UN Security Council and Force and Police Commanders. This will help the mission adapt operations as necessary.

2B
Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada supports measures to tangibly enhance access to, and the protection of, humanitarian and medical missions.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada co-sponsored UN Security Council Resolution 2286 in May 2016 on the protection of medical personnel and facilities in armed conflict. Canada also co-sponsored of the UN General Assembly resolution on the "Safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of UN personnel," and helped to mobilize the UN General Assembly in October and December 2016 to hold special sessions on the situation in Syria, which included passing resolution A/71/L.39 calling for, inter alia, accountability for violations of international humanitarian law.

    In addition, on the margins of the World Health Assembly in May 2016, Canada’s Minister of Health hosted a panel discussion on Protecting Medical Missions in Conflict Zones to raise the profile of the issue and urge implementation of the resolution.

    Further, Canada, along with Switzerland, co-leads an Informal Group on UN Security Council resolution 2286 based in Geneva. This group brings States together to mobilize international leadership for protecting medical missions.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is closely tracking international progress in implementing UN Security Council resolution 2286. This includes regular internal discussions, meetings with other States, and meetings with humanitarian partners and civil society.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that humanitarians operate in increasingly complex and dangerous environments, which requires consistent advocacy efforts to uphold international humanitarian law. Accountability for attacks against medical and humanitarian personnel remains a serious challenge for the international community.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to participate in the Informal Group on UN Security Council resolution 2286 based in Geneva, and seek opportunities to highlight this issue in multilateral fora (for example in meetings and resolutions of the UN General Assembly, in open debates of the Security Council, and the World Health Assembly). Canada will continue to advocate on this issue through all available channels.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions', what would it be

    States and non-state actors who are parties to armed conflict must acknowledge and take responsibility to act on their legal obligations.

2C
Speak out on violations

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is a strong supporter of international humanitarian law and has signed and ratified relevant international instruments, including the 1949 Conventions and Additional Protocols. In addition, Canada has ratified seven UN human rights treaties and five optional protocols. Canada is also a committed State Party of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and supports its mandate to end impunity for serious international crimes.

  • Achievements at a glance

    As a staunch supporter of the international human rights system, Canada works diligently to contribute to its effectiveness, including through multilateral and bilateral engagement, and financial support for projects that advance human rights. In 2016, Canada announced that it will contribute CAD $15 million over the next three years to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Furthermore, in June 2016, Canada announced that it supports the Political Declaration on the Suspension of the Veto in Cases of Mass Atrocities and the Code of Conduct regarding Security Council Action against Genocide, Crimes against Humanity or War Crimes. In country-specific situations, Canada has also issued statements recalling legal obligations and calling for accountability for violations and abuses of international law.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada consistently speaks out to condemn serious violations of international humanitarian law and serious violations and abuses of international human rights law, urging accountability for alleged perpetrators. How to do so consistently and through best available channels is the subject of regular internal discussions and meetings with humanitarian partners and civil society. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The main challenge to international humanitarian law lies in a lack of implementation by states and non-state actors. Efforts need to be focused on achieving greater compliance with the existing legal framework.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to promote respect for and compliance with international law as well as to call for accountability for alleged perpetrators.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Speak out on violations', what would it be

    States and non-state actors who are parties to armed conflict must acknowledge and take responsibility to act on their legal obligations. The establishment of an effective international mechanism aimed at improving compliance with IHL would advance this issue.

2D
Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability

Individual Commitment

Joint Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is a strong supporter of measures to tangibly enhance the protection of civilians. In particular, gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls are key Canadian priorities.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada promotes compliance with international humanitarian and human rights law as a matter of priority in the UN General Assembly resolutions on “Strengthening of coordination of humanitarian and disaster relief assistance” and "Safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of UN personnel," which it customarily co-sponsors.

    Canada helped to mobilize the UN General Assembly in October and December 2016 to hold special sessions on the situation in Syria, which included passing resolution A/71/L.39 calling for, inter alia, humanitarian access and compliance and accountability for violations of international humanitarian law.

    As a member of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies, Canada is providing CAD$40.5 million in multi-year programming (2016-2018) to UNFPA, and strengthening existing internal and external guidance on gender equality and gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian response.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Promoting and enhancing respect for international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and refugee law are longstanding priorities for the Government of Canada. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and its partners, including UNFPA and the ICRC, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that humanitarian crises are becoming increasingly complex. Accountability for violations of international humanitarian law remains a significant challenge for the international community, and strong and consistent efforts are needed to ensure respect for, and compliance with, IHL.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to promote respect for international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and refugee law as a matter or priority. The Government is committed to ensuring that Canada accedes to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and is taking the necessary legal and regulatory steps that will allow Canada to meet all ATT obligations.

    The Government of Canada recently announced CDN$ 650 million over three years in funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights. Canada is also considering further multi-year funding toward GBV prevention and response in humanitarian contexts.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability', what would it be

    Gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls must be at the centre of humanitarian action.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3D - Empower and protect women and girls

2E
Uphold the rules: a global campaign to affirm the norms that safeguard humanity

Individual Commitment

Joint Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada consistently promotes respect for international law. Notably, Canada was a driving force behind adoption of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (APMBC), and remains committed to advancing its norms, including a complete ban on the use of anti-personnel mines, and to helping to achieve a world free of anti-personnel mines.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada advocated for universalization of the APMBC at the UN General Assembly and APMBC multilateral meetings. At APMBC intersessionals, Canada chaired a panel on political will for universalization and implementation. Canada also advocated for creation of an APMBC group on universalization and committed publicly to participate in a universalization campaign. Canada joined the APMBC Committee on Enhancement of Cooperation and Assistance to help states parties achieve the APMBC goal of a mine free world.

    Canada announced multi-year mine action support in Colombia for CAD $13.8 million for 2016-2021, and CAD $3.9 million in Ukraine. Canada also continued to contribute to mine action in Afghanistan as part of a multi-year CAD $20 million commitment until 2020. Further, Canada supported mine action in Iraq for CAD $6 million. Canada continues to support demining in Sri Lanka, and advocates for it to accede to the APMBC. In addition, Canada provided support to mine action as part of broader multi-sector humanitarian responses.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is not a mine-affected country. It reports on its mine action financial support to affected states as part of its annual transparency reports to the APMBC, Convention on Cluster Munitions, and Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons Amended Protocol II and Protocol V.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada is concerned about the recent increase in the number of victims, and also declining financial support internationally. Use of AP mines by non-state actors and some states have contributed to the increase in victims. Lack of information about mine-affected countries’ priorities and needs, coordination (among donors and among affected state stakeholders), and longer-term strategies and political will, contribute to funding decline.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada intends to join the APMBC universalization group and support the APMBC Austrian presidency’s universalization work. Canada will also continue to advocate for APMBC universalization in various multilateral fora, and bilaterally as opportunities arise.

    Canada will continue to serve on the APMBC Committee on Enhancement of Cooperation and Assistance and in particular help to support development of better stakeholder coordination and information sharing mechanisms.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Uphold the rules: a global campaign to affirm the norms that safeguard humanity', what would it be

    Anti-personnel mines kill and maim civilians and prevent reconstruction and development, and the risks that they pose outweigh their military value. Universalisation of the APMBC can end the suffering these weapons cause. Increased transparency, accountability, and stakeholder coordination can build stronger, longer-term stakeholder relationships to achieve a mine free world.

  • Cross cutting issues

    People-Centred Approach

3A
Reduce and address displacement

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to assisting and protecting people who have been forcibly displaced by humantiarian crises. Canada is a State Party to the 1951 Refugee Convention and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada’s multi-year response to the Syria and Iraq crises focuses on supporting refugees, IDPs and host communities concurrently, and Canada’s humanitarian and development programs are working to improve complementarity in planning and delivering on its commitment to provide CAD $840 million in humanitarian assistance and CAD $270 million in development assistance over three years (2016-2018).

    In addition, Canada resettled 46,000 refugees in 2016. Canada is also exploring options to expand the student refugee program; work with other countries to coordinate migration programming; provide training and technical support to expand the number of global resettlement spaces; and help host states to build their migration management capacity.

    The Government of Canada also announced that by December 31, 2017, Canada would offer assistance to up to 1,200 survivors of Daesh and their family members by resettling them to Canada, this will include refugees and IDPs.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, as appropriate. Progress against Canada’s annual resettlement program level targets is reported to Parliament annually through the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration. Canada will also participate in a high-level meeting in September 2017 in New York that will focus on taking stock of implementation of the commitments made at the 2016 Leaders’ Summit on Refugees.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Forced displacement remains at record levels. Canada is working closely with its humanitarian and development partners to identify improved outcomes that can be achieved by promoting complementary approaches on the ground.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada is assessing the lessons learned from its integrated humanitarian and development approach in response to the Syria and Iraq crises, with a view to potentially replicating this combined strategy in other contexts of protracted displacement.

    In 2017, Canada plans to resettle 25,000 refugees – a target that remains among the highest in Canada’s history. Canada will also continue to play an active role in the development of a Global Compact on Refugees, and participate in meetings of the Steering Committee for the Platform on Disaster Displacement.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reduce and address displacement', what would it be

    The global refugee response community should continue to enhance approaches to address and reduce forced displacement worldwide, including through the development of a Global Compact on Refugees. States need to work towards increasing refugee resettlement and promoting complementary pathways as part of their contributions to comprehensive responses to forced displacement.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides 5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

3B
Address the vulnerabilities of migrants and provide more regular and lawful opportunities for migration

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada supports efforts to protect migrants and provide more regular and lawful opportunities for migration.

  • Achievements at a glance

    On September 19, 2016, Canada, along with all other UN Member States, adopted the New York Declaration on Refugees and Migrants. Canada supports the development of a Global Compact on Refugees and a Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

    Canada also provided funding for a number of initiatives to support migrants in 2016. For example, Canada announced that it will contribute CAD $5.5 million over five years to support regional efforts in Asia aimed at strengthening policies and protection for migrant workers. http://www.international.gc.ca/asean/news-communiques/2016/09/20a_bg.aspx?lang=eng. Canada also announced support of CAD $5.75 million over two years to IOM to assist vulnerable migrants, especially women and children, in Haiti. In addition, Canada provides significant support to humanitarian partners, notably UNHCR and IOM, to help address the humanitarian needs of refugees and migrants worldwide.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The September 2016 Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants highlighted the many challenges that migrants face. Canada sees the development of a Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration as a way to improve how the international community is responding to the challenges and opportunities of international migration. Through this process, Canada would like to see a Compact developed that promotes the value of more comprehensive, planned migration systems; helps identify gaps in existing international frameworks to appropriately regulate migration; and includes measures to protect the specific human rights of migrant women and girls.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to play an active role in the development of a Global Compact on Safe, Regular and Orderly Migration, as well as explore options for scaling up programming in this area.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Address the vulnerabilities of migrants and provide more regular and lawful opportunities for migration', what would it be

    The international community must develop more effective approaches to managing migration, and step up efforts to ensure human dignity and the humane treatment of migrants.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Refugees

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement

3C
End statelessness in the next decade

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada has ratified the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness and complies with its obligation to prevent and reduce future cases of statelessness.

  • Achievements at a glance

    On September 19, 2016, UN Member States adopted the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, which includes recognition of UNHCR’s campaign to end statelessness and encourages States to consider actions to reduce statelessness. Canada supports the principles and commitments contained within the Declaration, including the development of a Global Compact on Refugees by 2018.

    Canada supports the work of UNHCR in drawing attention to, and seeking to resolve, situations of statelessness, and welcomes UNHCR’s global campaign to eradicate it. Canada provides significant funding to UNHCR, which includes the eradication of statelessness in the Agency’s Global Strategic Priorities, as part of ensuring a favourable protection environment.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and its partners, including UNHCR, as appropriate. Canada also participates in Member State briefings on the implementation of the New York Declaration and is actively engaged in the process to develop the Global Compact on Refugees.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Statelessness remains a challenge globally, and stateless persons continue to face significant barriers in accessing basic rights and services.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada has safeguards in both its citizenship and immigration legislation to generally cover the situation of stateless persons. Nonetheless, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is reviewing measures to address the situation of stateless persons in Canada.

    As Chair of UNHCR's Executive Committee for 2017, Canada will continue to support UNHCR in the Agency’s efforts to lead Member States in the first year of the development of the Global Compact on Refugees, to be completed by 2018. Canada will also be providing multi-year funding (CAD$ 37.8 million, 2017-2019) to support UNHCR's core activities.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'End statelessness in the next decade', what would it be

    The international community should promote greater international solidarity and responsibility-sharing to advance this issue, and continue to undertake concrete measures to reduce statelessness, including through the development of a Global Compact on Refugees by 2018.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Refugees

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement 3B - Address the vulnerabilities of migrants and provide more regular and lawful opportunities for migration

3D
Empower and protect women and girls

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls are key Canadian priorities.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is scaling up efforts to ensure that the needs of women and girls are addressed and integrated across its humanitarian policies and programming, and is prioritizing initiatives which focus on empowering women, and address sexual and gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health and rights. Canada also supports humanitarian agencies whose activities include leadership training for women, for example, through renewed support to the Gender Standby Capacity Project (GenCap).

    As a member of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies, Canada is also committed to strengthening existing internal and external guidance on gender equality and gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian response, and to providing multi-year funding for prevention and response to GBV in humanitarian contexts. For example, Canada is providing CAD $40.5 million in multi-year programming on sexual and gender-based violence with UNFPA in response to the crises in Syria and Iraq.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada reports, as appropriate. Partners noted above will also be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Fully addressing the needs of women and girls remains a challenge in humanitarian responses. Canada is working closely with its partners to ensure that the specific needs of women and girls are fully integrated into the design and implementation of, and follow-up to, all policies and programs.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada recently announced CDN $650 million over three years in funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights. Canada will also play an active role as a co-chair of the States Group of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies. In addition, Canada will revise its Humanitarian NGO Funding Guidelines to ensure that the needs of women and girls are fully integrated into the projects it supports.

    Canada will identify additional ways to support this commitment in conjunction with the results of its International Assistance Review, which will be finalized in 2017.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Empower and protect women and girls', what would it be

    Humanitarian and development actors should scale up efforts to effectively integrate the specific needs of women and girls into the design, implementation and follow-up phases of all policies and programs.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2D - Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability

3E
Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada has been a long standing champion of education in emergencies in protracted crises and fragile states. Canada has provided over CAD $400 million to education initiatives for refugees and their host communities in response to the Syria and Iraq crises, including CAD $239 million for the “No Lost Generation” initiative, and over CAD $165 million in complementary longer-term development assistance to build the resilience and quality of the education systems in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Egypt.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Access to quality education for girls, adolescent women, and refugees, and providing multi-year humanitarian assistance financing to minimize gaps in education in emergencies remain priorities for Canada. On the margins of the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants (19 September 2016), Canada pledged CAD $20 million over two years to the Education Cannot Wait Fund to ensure the right to education for emergency-affected children around the world, including to address the specific needs of girls and young women.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant reports from Global Affairs Canada and education partners, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada is working closely with its partners to address any challenges that arise in implementing its Education Cannot Wait commitments.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will support Education Cannot Wait to ensure the right to education for emergency-affected children and youth around the world, including to address the specific needs of girls and young women. For example, in 2017, Canada will take action to advance Education Cannot Wait’s efforts to reduce the barriers to girls’ education in crisis situations, including sexual and gender-based violence in and around schools and lack of safe water, sanitation, and menstrual hygiene management in schools.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people', what would it be

    In times of conflict or crisis, access to quality education must be prioritized along with meeting other basic needs.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2D - Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability 5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

3F
Enable adolescents and young people to be agents of positive transformation

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is supportive of efforts which enable adolescents and young people to be agents of positive change.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Support for this commitment is championed at the highest levels. Canada's Minister of International Development and La Francophonie is on the High-Level Steering Group for Every Woman Every Child, and is working to mobilize action on the empowerment of women, children, and adolescents, including in humanitarian and fragile settings. Further, as a member of the World Health Organization/Office for the High Commissioner for Human Rights' High-Level Working Group for the Health and Human Rights of Women, Children, and Adolescents, the Minister is championing the adoption of human rights-based approaches to health at the country level, including drawing attention to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress towards this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, progress in these commitments will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and partners noted above, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Fully addressing the needs of adolescents and young people remains a challenge in humanitarian responses, and Canada is working with its partners to ensure that all crisis-affected people are included in the design, implementation and follow-up phases of humanitarian programming.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In addition to ongoing implementation of the initiatives noted above, Canada will continue to look for ways to further advance this commitment. In particular, Canada will fund a number of new projects in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan, from 2017 - 2019, which a focus on supporting adolescents and youth to develop leadership and life skills.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Enable adolescents and young people to be agents of positive transformation', what would it be

    Enabling adolescents and young people to be agents of positive transformation is key to crisis recovery.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3D - Empower and protect women and girls

3G
Address other groups or minorities in crisis settings

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada aims to address the needs of vulnerable groups and minorities affected by humanitarian crises as part of its humanitarian response.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada works with its partners to ensure that the needs of specific crisis-affected populations are met. For example, since the events of October 2016 in Rakhine, Canada increased advocacy and support for the Rohingya people, taking every opportunity to raise the plight of the Rohingya with the highest authorities in Myanmar. In 2016, Canada also provided CAD $4.3 million in humanitarian assistance to address the urgent needs of vulnerable populations displaced by conflict in Myanmar and Bangladesh, including the Rohingya.

    Further, in exceptional cases, Canada has legal mechanisms to extend protection to particularly vulnerable groups or individuals. One recent example is the Government’s commitment to provide assistance to victims of Daesh, including vulnerable Yazidi women and girls. The Government of Canada has announced that by December 31, 2017, Canada would offer assistance to up to 1,200 survivors of Daesh and their family members by resettling them to Canada. This includes both refugees and IDPs.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into reports by Global Affairs Canada and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, as appropriate.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Fully addressing the needs of minorities and other vulnerable groups remains a challenge in humanitarian responses, and Canada is working with its partners to ensure that all crisis-affected people are included in the design, implementation and follow-up phases of humanitarian programming.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will seek to identify additional ways to support this commitment in conjunction with the results of its International Assistance Review, which will be finalized in Spring 2017.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Address other groups or minorities in crisis settings', what would it be

    Meaningfully addressing the needs of vulnerable groups, including minorities, is necessary to ensuring an effective and inclusive response. Societies that harness their diversity to design and implement inclusive policies and programs create the conditions for greater respect for human rights and a pathway to peace, security, and prosperity.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender Internal Displacement Refugees

4A
Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada has been actively exploring options to better support local humanitarian response actors.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Through multi-year financial support under its Strategic Partnership with the Canadian Red Cross (CRC), Canada is providing CAD $19.8 million from 2014-2019 in support of two initiatives aimed at strengthening the capacity of targeted Red Cross national societies in the Americas and Africa. These initiatives have been designed to be owned and led by each national society, with the guidance and support of the CRC and the IFRC. Canada is also continuing to support the IFRC's Emergency Disaster Assistance Fund.

    In addition, in 2016, Canada supported country-based pooled funds in Yemen, South Sudan, Iraq and CAR, as part of its increased efforts to provide support to local humanitarian actors. Canada also announced CAD $125 million, 2016-2020, for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank - a partnership of 15 churches and church-based agencies that manages a draw-down fund to provide food assistance. The majority of funding and programming flows to, and is being implemented by, local actors.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada reports, as appropriate. Partners noted above will also be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Local actors continue to face barriers in accessing international support. Funding that is available is often short term and restrictive. Further, in some cases, risk continues to be downloaded to local partners without adequate support.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Through Canada’s International Assistance Review process, Canada is examining tools and mechanisms to increase and improve assistance delivered by local and national responders. The review will be completed in 2017. Canada is also consulting with civil society organizations and partners to identify opportunities to deepen collaboration with local actors and remove barriers to partnership.

    In addition, Canada is actively participating in the Grand Bargain localization workstream and assisting in the development of definitions around funding for local actors and a localization marker.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems', what would it be

    Building the response capacity of local humanitarian actors is essential to more effectively meeting and reducing humanitarian needs over the long term.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Country Based Pooled Funds

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5A - Invest in local capacities

4B
Anticipate, do not wait, for crises

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to reducing vulnerability and to bridging the humanitarian-development nexus, including through joint planning and complementary programming.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is supporting a new multi-year Resilience Initiative, providing CAD $50 million over five years (2016-2020). Through a complementary mix of interventions, WFP, FAO and IFAD will meet immediate food needs, while also addressing longer-term challenges to build resilience of vulnerable populations in Somalia, DRC, and Niger.

    Canada ratified the Paris Agreement in October 2016. To implement the Agreement, Canada has committed to deliver CAD $2.65 billion in climate finance to support developing countries to address climate change. Canada will be implementing this commitment in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.

    Canada also hosted the Fifth Regional Platform on Disaster Risk Reduction in the Americas (March 2017). The main outcome documents, the high-level Montreal Declaration and the multi-stakeholder Regional Action Plan on disaster risk reduction in the Americas, set out clear expressions of commitment and a plan of how to implement DRR in the region.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada reports, as appropriate. Partners noted above will also be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

    Canada’s progress on Sendai will be tracked through its input to the Sendai reporting mechanism and, as appropriate, through other relevant commitments such as the “Regional Action Plan for the Implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015 – 2030 in the Americas”.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    In many contexts, humanitarian and development actors continue to operate in 'silos,' and must make increased and concerted efforts to better prepare for crises, and identify areas for joint collaboration.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In addition to ongoing implementation of the initiatives noted above, Canada will continue to look for ways to further advance this commitment, including as part of the Grand Bargain workstreams and the New Way of Working Initiative. Through its International Assistance Review, Canada is examining opportunities to further improve collaboration between different programs, including joint planning.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Anticipate, do not wait, for crises', what would it be

    The international community must work collectively, and across mandates, to effectively reduce vulnerability.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction Food Security

  • Specific initiatives

    New Way of Working The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems 4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

4C
Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to reducing vulnerability and to bridging the humanitarian-development nexus, including through joint planning and complementary programming.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is actively providing coherent financing and promoting collective outcomes. Canada’s response to the Syria and Iraq crises, for example, focuses on supporting refugees, IDPs and host communities concurrently, and Canada’s humanitarian and development teams have been working closely together to ensure complementarity in planning and delivering on our commitment to provide CAD $840 million in humanitarian assistance, and CAD $270 million in development assistance over the next three years.

    In addition, Canada committed to several new unearmarked, multi-year funding agreements, including: World Food Programme (CAD $125 million, 2016-2020), the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CAD $125 million, 2016-2020), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (CAD $6 million, 2016-2018), and the Central Emergency Response Fund (CAD $147 million, 2016-2020).

    Further, in 2016, the Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP) - supported in part by Canada - delivered cash or food transfers to some 8 million beneficiaries, up from 5 million in 2015.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada reports, as appropriate. Partners supported through the funding noted above will be reporting on results achieved through their own reporting processes.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Closer collaboration between humanitarian and development actors is needed to reduce vulnerability and build resilience. In particular, an increased focus on joint planning and analysis is required to drive this transformation forward.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to look for ways to further advance this commitment, including as part of the Grand Bargain workstreams, the New Way of Working Initiative, and through deeper collaboration with the World Bank.

    In particular, Canada is exploring options to further increase multi-year planning and funding, including supporting NGOs to undertake multi-year funding in countries where there is a multi-year HRP.

    Canada is also developing a three-year monitoring and evaluation plan to assess the outcomes of the multi-year response to the Syria and Iraq crises, and to identify avenues for strengthening multi-year programming.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides', what would it be

    The international community must work collectively, and across mandates, to effectively reduce vulnerability.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Cash Central Emergency Response Fund Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    New Way of Working The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

5A
Invest in local capacities

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada has been actively exploring options to better support local humanitarian response actors.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada’s Strategic Partnership with the Canadian Red Cross aims to strengthen and build the capacity and resiliency of people, local authorities, national societies, and communities in developing countries to better prepare for, respond to, and recover from crisis, so that they can lead their own humanitarian response efforts. This Partnership has enabled Canada to adopt a multi-year, strategic approach to enhancing humanitarian response capacity at the national (including local) regional and global levels, through a portfolio of complementary response readiness and capacity building projects.

    In addition, in 2016, Canada supported country-based pooled funds in Yemen, South Sudan, Iraq and CAR. Canada also announced CAD $125 million, 2016-2020, for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank - a partnership of 15 churches and church-based agencies that manages a draw-down fund to provide food assistance. The majority of funding and programming flows to, and is being implemented by, local actors.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada Reports, as appropriate. Partners noted above will also be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Local actors continue to face barriers in accessing international support. Funding that is available is often short term and restrictive. Further, in some cases, risk continues to be downloaded to local partners without adequate support.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Through Canada’s International Assistance Review process, Canada is examining tools and mechanisms to increase and improve assistance delivered by local and national responders. The review will be completed by 2017. Canada is also consulting with civil society organizations and partners to identify opportunities to deepen collaboration with local actors and remove barriers to partnership.

    In addition, Canada is actively participating in the Grand Bargain localization workstream and assisting in the development of definitions around funding for local actors and a localization marker.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Invest in local capacities', what would it be

    Building the response capacity of local humanitarian actors is essential to more effectively meeting and reducing humanitarian needs over the long term.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Country Based Pooled Funds

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

5B
Invest according to risk

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to reducing vulnerability and to bridging the humanitarian-development nexus, including through joint planning and complementary programming.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is supporting a new multi-year Resilience Initiative, valued at CAD $50 million over five years (2016-2020). Through a complementary mix of interventions, WFP, FAO and IFAD, will meet immediate food needs, while also addressing longer-term challenges to build resilience of vulnerable populations in Somalia, DRC, and Niger.

    Canada ratified the Paris Agreement in October 2016. To implement the Agreement, Canada has committed to deliver CAD $2.65 billion in climate finance to support developing countries to address climate change. Canada will be implementing this commitment in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.

    Further, Canada hosted the Fifth Regional Platform on Disaster Risk Reduction in the Americas (March 2017). Canada has also been engaged in the “Open-ended Intergovernmental Expert Working Group on Indicators and Terminology Relating to Disaster Risk Reduction.” The resulting indicators and terminology will play a key role in implementing Sendai globally, including by framing the follow-up and reporting mechanisms on the Sendai targets.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada Reports, as appropriate. Partners noted above will also be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

    Canada’s progress on Sendai will be tracked through its input to the Sendai reporting mechanism and, as appropriate, through other relevant commitments such as the “Regional Action Plan for the Implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015 – 2030 in the Americas.”

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Closer collaboration between humanitarian and development actors is needed to reduce vulnerability and build resilience. In particular, an increased focus on joint planning and analysis is required to drive this transformation forward.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In addition to ongoing implementation of the approaches and initiatives noted above, Canada will continue to work to further advance this commitment, including through the Grand Bargain worksteams. In particular, Canada will look for opportunities to deepen its engagement with the World Bank and the New Way of Working Initiative.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Invest according to risk', what would it be

    The international community must work collectively, and across mandates, to effectively reduce vulnerability.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction Food Security

  • Specific initiatives

    New Way of Working The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4B - Anticipate, do not wait, for crises 4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

5C
Invest in stability

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    This commitment is one of Canada’s foreign policy priorities, namely to “advance Canada’s values and interests through leadership and constructive engagement on key global issues with strategic partners, including at the UN and other multilateral institutions”. This includes increasing “support for peace operations, mediation, conflict-prevention, reconstruction and early recovery efforts.” (http://www.international.gc.ca/gac-amc/priorities-priorites.aspx?lang=eng)

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada pledged up to 600 military personnel to be available for possible deployment to UN peace operations. Complementing this, Canada announced a 3-year, CAD $450 million Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) to work on stabilization and fragile state policy, support coordinated Canadian responses to conflicts and crises abroad, and design and deliver stabilization initiatives. As an early contribution through PSOPs, Canada has sought to reinforce the capacity of the UN for conflict prevention and peacebuilding. In September 2016, Canada announced up to CAD $25 million over three years to help enhance UN capacities in conflict prevention, mediation, and peacebuilding. This new funding is comprised of CAD $10 million over three years to the UN Department of Political Affairs, and up to CAD $15 million over three years to the UN Peacebuilding Fund.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is tracking progress through Global Affairs Canada annual reporting processes, as appropriate, as well as the reporting required by the terms and conditions of various programs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Canada recognizes that crisis situations are becoming increasingly complex, and concerted efforts are required to uphold international humanitarian and human rights law.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will host the 2017 Ministerial on Peacekeeping as a means of continuing the work to support peace operations and make them more effective. Canada will also join the UN Group of Friends of Mediation and will engage with partner countries and organizations in order to identify opportunities where Canada could contribute positively to the prevention or resolution of conflict.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Invest in stability', what would it be

    Interventions in preventing, managing, or resolving violent conflict should be integrated to the extent possible. While it is important to address immediate causes and drivers of conflict, deeper factors contributing to conflict must also be considered.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1B - Act early 1C - Remain engaged and invest in stability

5D
Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to reducing vulnerability and to bridging the humanitarian-development nexus, including through joint planning and complementary programming.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is actively providing coherent financing and promoting collective outcomes. Canada’s response to the Syria and Iraq crises, for example, focuses on supporting refugees, IDPs and host communities concurrently, and Canada’s humanitarian and development teams have been working closely together to ensure complementarity in planning and delivering on our commitment to provide CAD $840 million in humanitarian assistance, and CAD $270 million in development assistance over the next three years.

    In addition, Canada committed to several new unearmarked, multi-year funding agreements, including: World Food Programme (CAD $125 million, 2016-2020), the Canadian Foodgrains Bank (CAD $125 million, 2016-2020), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (CAD $6 million, 2016-2018), and the Central Emergency Response Fund (CAD $147 million, 2016-2020).

    Much of Canada’s funding is unearmarked or loosely earmarked (e.g. to the regional level), allowing organizations the flexibility to adapt specific program activities as needed.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada is actively tracking progress toward this commitment. In addition to assessing progress and reporting through the PACT, commitments will be integrated into relevant Global Affairs Canada Reports, as appropriate. Further, Canada’s progress against the WHS core financing commitments is captured in Canada’s Grand Bargain Report. Partners noted above will be reporting on these initiatives through their own reporting processes.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Closer collaboration between humanitarian and development actors is needed to reduce vulnerability and build resilience. In particular, an increased focus on joint planning and analysis is required to drive this transformation forward.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to look for ways to further advance this commitment, including as part of the Grand Bargain workstreams, the New Way of Working Initiative, and through deeper collaboration with the World Bank.

    In particular, Canada is exploring options to further increase multi-year planning and funding, including supporting NGOs to undertake multi-year funding in countries where there is a multi-year HRP.

    Canada is also developing a three-year monitoring and evaluation plan to assess the outcomes of the multi-year response to the Syria and Iraq crises, and to identify avenues for strengthening multi-year programming.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing', what would it be

    The international community must work collectively, and across mandates, to effectively reduce vulnerability.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Central Emergency Response Fund Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    New Way of Working The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

5E
Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Canada is committed to reducing vulnerability and to bridging the humanitarian-development nexus, including through joint planning and complementary programming.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Canada is committed to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the international humanitarian response system. One of the key ways in which Canada is working to increase efficiency is through our co-leadership of the Grand Bargain multi-year planning and funding work stream, with UNICEF. The objectives of the work stream have been to build the evidence base for and promote mutual learning on humanitarian multi-year planning and funding, and to improve the quality and impact of humanitarian action through increased collaborative humanitarian multi-year planning and funding. Similarly, Canada has taken on the co-lead of the multi-year planning and funding work stream with the EU in the Good Humanitarian Donorship (GHD) group. Through both of these efforts, Canada has focused on sharing information and best practices by hosting events, conference calls, and disseminating relevant evaluations and studies to Grand Bargain signatories and the GHD membership.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Canada’s progress against the WHS core financing commitments is captured in Canada’s Grand Bargain Report.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    With a shift toward more predictable and flexible funding, it will be increasingly important for humanitarian agencies to produce high-quality needs assessments and multi-year planning and reporting documents.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Canada will continue to look for ways to further advance this commitment, including as part of the Grand Bargain workstreams, the New Way of Working Initiative, and through deeper collaboration with the World Bank.

    In particular, Canada is exploring options to further increase multi-year planning and funding, including supporting NGOs to undertake multi-year funding in countries where there is a multi-year HRP.

    Canada is also developing a three-year monitoring and evaluation plan to assess the outcomes of the multi-year response to the Syria and Iraq crises, and to identify avenues for strengthening multi-year programming.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency', what would it be

    The international community must work collectively, and across mandates, to effectively reduce vulnerability.

  • Specific initiatives

    New Way of Working The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides 5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

Attachments

  • Self report attachment
    5E | The Grand Bargain