Progress Report

The self-report below is organized according to the 24 transformations of the Agenda for Humanity. It is based on commitments pledged at the time of report submission. Click on the 'Expand' symbol to expand each section and read the reporting inputs by transformation.

1B
Act early

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU has instated many tools for conflict prevention that could serve as a model for others, for example: the EU Conflict Early Warning System (EWS); a light-touch methodology for joint conflict analyses with international partners; and a comprehensive approach to external conflicts and crises; all of which better harness the EU's full potential to support conflict prevention activities. However, in a more challenging global political context, the full implementation of these initiatives is even more important and further actions and innovative solutions are urgently needed.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In June 2016, the EU presented a new Global Strategy for the EU's foreign and security policy to ensure its institutions, expertise, and instruments work together and with Member States in conflict prevention. The EEAS established a single focal point for conflict related issues, namely prevention, response, resolution and stabilisation. The EU improved its Conflict EWS to better identify strategic conflict prevention activities. The EU delivered training to EU Special Representatives and Envoys to strengthen their prevention roles, such as in Colombia. The EU further strengthened partnerships with international and regional organisations (e.g. with the World Bank on fragility, conflict and violence as well as on Recovery and Peace Assessments); the EU-UN conflict prevention partnership meetings now take place annually; the EU continued support to early warning capacities of OAS, ASEAN, CARICOM and LAS, and played a role on the IDPS and the implementation of the New Deal.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU external action on conflict prevention further improved through early identification of risk of violent conflict, and closing the gap to early action; better understanding of conflict situations (root causes, actors and dynamics); enhanced identification of the range of options for EU action; and conflict-sensitive programming of external assistance.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Conflict prevention activities are always sensitive for third party supporters and communication and messaging becomes very important.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU plans to continue the implementation of the WHS commitments by e.g. increasing the number of joint conflict analyses and conflict sensitivity trainings, as well as deployment of EU Special Representatives with stronger prevention mandates.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Act early', what would it be

    It is crucial to recognise the need for continous and targeted conflict analysis to ensure strategic, effective and conflict sensitive prevention support to third parties.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Innovation Urban

  • Specific initiatives

    Global Partnership for Preparedness

1C
Remain engaged and invest in stability

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU is able to employ its wide array of external assistance instruments in support of conflict prevention and peace building. The EU is one of the biggest donors in this area.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In cooperation with EU Member States, the EU deployed cross-cutting technical experts to the field. The EU increased capacity-building activities for EU Delegation staff worldwide, including on conflict analysis and sensitivity skills. Through its Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace, the EU supported security initiatives and peace-building activities in 70 countries so far, for example where a crisis is unfolding, or long-term support to global and trans-regional threats.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU further improved the links between early warning and early action by engaging EU staff in the field. The EU improved early warning capabilities of civil society actors around the world through dedicated funding.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The current financial climate is not conducive to increasing staff capacities in the field.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU plans to work closer with EU Member States to better coordinate activities in the field and benefit from their expertise.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Remain engaged and invest in stability', what would it be

    There is a need for truly cross-cutting conflict experts in the field to cover development-political-security nexus.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Innovation

2A
Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Ensuring protection of populations is a core objective of EU humanitarian action, as defined by the 1996 Humanitarian Aid Regulation and confirmed by the European Consensus on Humanitarian Aid. The EU has funded protection interventions with an aim to prevent, reduce and respond to the risks and consequences of violence, deprivation and abuse. The EU has also financially supported the Global Protection Cluster.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In May 2016, the EU developed new policy guidelines "Humanitarian Protection: Improving protection outcomes to reduce risks for people in humanitarian crises", which outline the definition and objectives of the Commission’s humanitarian protection work. The document provides guidance for the programming of protection work in humanitarian crises, for measuring the effect of interventions, and for planning related capacity building activities.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Protection remains a key priority both in policy and operational terms. The new policy guidelines will continue to guide EU action in protection work.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    There is a continued need to ensure that the centrality of protection remains at the heart of humanitarian action and is further promoted and strengthened.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will pursue the roll-out and dissemination of its new policy guidelines on protection, including through dedicated trainings and awareness-raising. The EU will explore possibilities for strategic and systematic funding of relevant protection activities.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2B - Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions

2B
Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Over the last decade systematic violations of IHL have been on the rise, the Syria conflict being a case in point. Some of the most recurrent violations affecting humanitarian action are direct attacks on the civilian population, attacks on civilian facilities such as schools and hospitals, denial of access to humanitarian aid and attacks on humanitarian workers. The EU is a key donor of humanitarian operations, and violations of IHL heavily impact and hamper the EU's investments in meeting needs of the affected populations and imperil the security of the EU's humanitarian partners and own staff in the field.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU promoted respect for IHL through political bilateral dialogues, multilateral fora (e.g. follow-up of UN Security Council resolution 2286, negotiations of the annual UN General Assembly resolution on safety and security of humanitarian personnel, Switzerland-ICRC IHL compliance process), field missions (e.g. of Commissioner Stylianides, where he advocates with authorities for IHL respect), and public statements (e.g. 31 October 2016 by HR/VP Mogherini and Commissioner Stylianides on West Aleppo). The EU provided humanitarian funding for dissemination of information on IHL, training on IHL and the humanitarian principles, and enhancing awareness among relevant professionals, especially those working in contexts where IHL is violated. The EU organised training courses internally and to Member States on civil-military relations. The EU engaged in strategic discussions with Member States on principled humanitarian action and IHL.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Follow-up and implementation of the 'EU Guidelines on International Humanitarian Law' by EU institutions as well as EU Member States.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Mainstreaming of the promotion and respect for IHL throughout all relevant EU activities requires further strengthening.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to implement the 'EU Guidelines on International Humanitarian Law' including by improving the reporting on the implementation by EU and its Member States. The EU will continue to advocate and reach out to third countries on compliance with IHL as well as to actively support the follow-up of UN Security Council resolution 2286, including the recommendations by the UN Secretary-General to ensure enhanced protection of medical and humanitarian personnel and hospitals. The EU will organise further training courses on the EEAS crisis management structures.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2A - Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities

2D
Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    It is an EU top priority to ensure that perpetrators of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity are held accountable for their actions, and to achieve justice for the victims of those crimes. Thus, the EU has been a strong supporter of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the universality of the Rome Statute, based on a 2011 Council Decision and a 2011 Action Plan on its implementation. The EU Global Strategy explicitly commits the EU to promote international criminal law and the universality of the Rome Statute. The EU has also been strongly involved in preventing and combating...

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU supported the ICC in multilateral fora, through financial assistance, bi-annual demarche campaigns, and public statements, notably on the notifications of withdrawal by South Africa, Burundi and Gambia. The EU continued implementing the 'EU Guide to Practical Actions for Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict'. It funded projects on violence against women, e.g. a survey across 10 countries in South Eastern Europe (€2 million), and a project on transitional justice processes in Kosovo, Colombia and the Philippines (€3.5 million). The EU also allocated €18 million of humanitarian aid to prevention and response to GBV in 84 projects, including in Syria, DRC and Somalia. The EU adopted a new Code of Conduct and Discipline for EU civilian CSDP missions. It also remained an active member of the Call for Action on Protection from GBV in emergencies.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU assesses progress through regular reporting on the implementation of the 2011 EU Action Plan by EU institutions and EU Member States; the 'EU Guide to Practical Actions for Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict'; sexual and gender-based violence related indicators regarding implementation of EU policy on Women, Peace and Security; EU's second Gender Action Plan for the period 2016-2020; EU Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality 2016-2019; EU Guidelines on Violence Against Women; EU Comprehensive Approach on Conflict and Crisis; reporting to the UN on the operationalisation of the Responsibility to Protect.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The notifications of withdrawal from the Rome Statute by South Africa, Burundi and Gambia raised serious concerns of the EU and its Members States.

    Main challenges relating to violence against women include: growing linkages between trafficking in persons and conflict-related sexual violence; ensuring a localised multi-stakeholder approach, based on supporting relevant local actors through formal partnerships, including civil society organisations; addressing sexual exploitation and abuse in peacekeeping, crisis management and humanitarian settings.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to implement the 2011 Council Decision and 2011 Action Plan on its implementation, including through political advocacy and outreach to promote the universality principle and to encourage pro-ICC African mobilisation and prevent withdrawals from the Rome Statue. The EU will continue to implement the 'EU Guide to Practical Actions for Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict' (SVC), support projects and cooperation with UN SRSG on SVC, continue advocacy through high-profile statements, and adopt upgraded Generic Standards of Behaviour, applicable to both civilian and military CSDP missions and operations.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3D - Empower and protect women and girls

2E
Uphold the rules: a global campaign to affirm the norms that safeguard humanity

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The multiplication of crises and armed conflict with dire humanitarian consequences has continued. The number of forcibly displaced persons has been unprecedented since World War II and the protection of civilians in conflicts remained an acute concern of the EU. Syria, as well as emergencies that risk being forgotten, have shown that civilians, especially women and children, bear the brunt of today's conflicts.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU continued to strongly promote compliance with IHL, in particular the Geneva Conventions, including through public statements. The EU and its Member States continued to implement the EU Guidelines on IHL. In order to improve implementation of international humanitarian law at the national level, the EU offered political and technical support to third countries in their efforts to adopt national legislation pertaining to their international humanitarian law obligations. The EU also funded programmes to help build effective and accountable security and justice sectors.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Regular reporting on the implementation of the 'EU Guidelines on International Humanitarian Law' by EU institutions as well as EU Member States.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Ensuring that the promotion of and respect for international humanitarian law is mainstreamed throughout all relevant EU activities remains a challenge.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to implement the 'EU Guidelines on International Humanitarian Law' including by improving the reporting on the implementation by EU institutions and EU Member States. The EU will continue advocacy and outreach to third countries on compliance with international humanitarian law standards.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles Internal Displacement

3A
Reduce and address displacement

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The importance of coordination and complementarity between the different areas of EU external action/aid was identified in the European Development Consensus. With the aim to address forced displacement more effectively and to gradually end dependence on humanitarian assistance in displacement situations, the EU proposed a new policy framework in its Communication "Lives in Dignity: from aid dependence to self-reliance". The EU actions on resettlement and effective integration could be strengthened through joint actions.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In its external cooperation, the EU mobilized a broad set of external cooperation instruments: humanitarian and development funding (including trust funds), the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP), political dialogue and, in Jordan, simplified rules for exports. Numerous actions were launched to improve access to basic services through national systems, e.g. education, health or water for both displaced and host communities, and access to employment, while closely coordinating humanitarian and development interventions. IcSP and trust funds strengthen early engagement, complementing EU humanitarian action. Joint assessments and humanitarian and development frameworks improved coordination. The EU proposed "Union Resettlement Framework" for more predictability and harmonization. An Action Plan on the Integration of Third-Country Nationals and a Proposal for a Regulation on Qualification provided legal, policy and support measures to enhance integration.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU has significantly stepped up and diversified its external engagement to address the effects of forced displacement and tailored its actions in line with its WHS commitments. The Resettlement Framework Proposal is currently being discussed by EU co-legislators. A number of Member States have already amended legislation and/or practices to implement new requirements regarding access to integration facilities in line with the Proposal for a Regulation on Qualification.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    While refugees can make positive contributions to their host societies, their socio-economic integration and in particular access to the labour market is often perceived as politically sensitive. The high-level agreement found in the Jordan Compact is therefore a welcome example of addressing host country concerns. Similarly, the inclusion of refugees in national development plans, a good practice e.g. in Uganda, requires both host countries responding to their responsibility and development partners to share that responsibility. Within the EU, implementation of the Qualification Directive is uneven due to varying support for integration.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The European Parliament, the Council and the Commission are currently discussing the Commission's proposal for a new European Development Consensus. It is hoped the institutions could agree a final text in the first half of 2017. By capitalising on existing good practices, identifying remaining gaps and promoting learning lessons the EU will continue to adapt the way it addresses forced displacement situations in line with its new approach. The EU will also continue close cooperation with UNHCR under the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework. Discussions on the Union Resettlement Framework and the Qualification Directive will continue.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reduce and address displacement', what would it be

    It is critical to agree on ways to share responsibility based on a better understanding of the impact of forced displacement. Forcibly displaced persons need to benefit from appropriate measures to promote their socio-economic integration.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Commitment to Action: Transcending the humanitarian - development divide Platform on Disaster Displacement

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

3B
Address the vulnerabilities of migrants and provide more regular and lawful opportunities for migration

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Following the entry into force of the EU-Turkey Statement, permanence of migrants on islands where a hotspot is present is currently longer than foreseen. In this framework, the European Commission, EU agencies and national authorities, supported by international organisations, are on the ground to ensure prioritised registration procedures for minors and other vulnerable migrants so that minors can be transferred swiftly to dedicated centres.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Building on the existing resettlement initiatives at EU level as well as on the experience gained through national resettlement programmes, the Commission adopted a proposal for a Regulation establishing a Union Resettlement Framework with the objective to facilitate the EU policy on resettlement and provide for a more predictable, collective, and harmonised approach with unified procedures.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The proposal is currently being discussed by the co-legislators, the Council and the Parliament.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Commitment to Action: Transcending the humanitarian - development divide Platform on Disaster Displacement

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement

3D
Empower and protect women and girls

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU adopted a gender approach to humanitarian aid as quality criterion for effective programming that reaches the most vulnerable. The EU Gender Action Plan 2016-2020 aims to transform lives by promoting and protecting women and girls' rights. Since 2008, the EU has been implementing a Comprehensive Approach on the implementation of the UNSG resolutions 1325 and 1820 on Women, Peace and Security(WPS), as an instrument for conflict prevention, security, peace, gender equality, human rights and sustainable development. In 2012, the EU committed to support partner countries to reduce stunting in children under 5 years by 7 million by 2025.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Since 2014, the EU uses a gender-age marker to assess to what extent each humanitarian action integrates gender and age considerations. In 2016, the EU allocated € 1.8 million of the humanitarian budget to global capacity building projects on gender and gender-based violence (GBV). In the context of WPS, in 2015 the EU pledged concrete actions to promote women's participation and leadership, end GBV in conflict, further integrate the gender dimension into countering emerging threats, and strengthen cooperative frameworks. WPS, gender equality and women's empowerment were included in the EU Global Strategy. The EU adopted indicators to broaden the way of measuring progress in implementing EU framework policy on WPS. The EU also funded projects aimed to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. The prevalence of stunting in the 40 nutrition focus countries of the EC has been reduced by 2% in 4 years.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU assesses progress through regular reporting on the implementation of the EU policy on WPS; 'EU Guide to Practical Actions for Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict'; the Gender Action Plan; the EU Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality 2016-2019; the EU Comprehensive Approach on Conflict and Crisis. The EU also reports on EU's commitments under the Call to Action on Protection from GBV in Emergencies; prepares updates on implementation of EU Guidelines on Violence Against Women; develops annual reports on stunting situation, trend and projections.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Main challenges include: matching political commitments with concrete actions; predictable and sustained financing; mobilizing and generating male leadership and involving men and boys; crafting a balanced and effective approach of targeted actions and effective mainstreaming, i.e. the integration of a gender perspective; government's commitment and capacity; lack of national malnutrition targets; donor coordination at country level.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue implementing its policies on gender in humanitarian aid and WPS, including by ensuring that pledges made in 2015 translate into concrete actions. It will continue awareness raising, political advocacy, bilateral and multilateral cooperation and capacity building of its staff and implementing partners on gender in humanitarian aid and WPS. The EU will promote national implementation of WPS in the EU, consolidate the European Network of Gender Focal Points and improve the gender balance within the EU institutions, including in management positions. The EU will continue working on achieving its 2020 target of €3.5B on reducing stunting.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Empower and protect women and girls', what would it be

    The EU must continue turning its policies into action. Implementation requires clear leadership and management as well as resources for implementation including gender subject matter experts.

    Focus on commitments that can be measured and for which there is a clear methodology; develop a specific area for nutrition on its own.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2D - Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability 4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

3E
Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU has long been a top donor and advocate for education. In last years, it has been increasingly focusing on supporting education in fragility, emergencies and protracted crises in recognition of the huge global financing gap and the unmet education needs of the most vulnerable children. The EU has also been working on linking its humanitarian and development efforts in this area. It adopted a Communication on Forced Displacement and Development in April 2016, recognising the importance of education in crises and the need for close cooperation between humanitarian and development actors to ensure longer-term perspectives from the start.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU allocated €70 million of its humanitarian budget to support education in emergencies (EiE) in 2016. 60% of development country education support went to fragile states, complemented by funds through several EU crisis Trust Funds. As a major donor to the Global Platform for Education, the EU influenced international debate on education, especially in fragile states. The EU engaged actively in the start-up of Education Cannot Wait Fund: it allocated €5 million, and Commissioner Mimica participated in the Fund's High-Level Steering Group. €21 million was allocated for a new programme on education in crisis environments. €200 million of the Madad Trust Fund funded education and higher education of Syrian refugees in Syria's neighbouring countries. €25.85 million was disbursed for education in Jordan. €550 million of the EU facility for refugees in Turkey supported access to education for Syrian refugees in Turkey.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU has progressed firmly, fulfilling all of its commitments on education. Education in emergencies has been firmly established as key priority both in policy and operational terms.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The EU supports education through a number of financing instruments using several channels of implementation at all levels. Coordination, including linking humanitarian and development funding, will need to be further strengthened in order to increase resource allocation efficiency and aid effectiveness in general. The EU also strives towards a more efficient coordination with its Members States. The global evidence base for EiE, including data availability and data quality, the documentation of best practices as well as research on what works, is rather scarce and should be strengthened.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to prioritise education in fragility, emergencies and protracted crises through international engagement, policy development and by funding operations. It will continue the implementation of its 2016 Communication on Forced Displacement and Development and strengthen the linkages between its humanitarian and development funding instruments and actors. The EU will continue to advocate for education as a basic need and a fundamental right of all children. In 2017 a global call for proposals will be launched (EUR 21 million) focusing on evidence based models for education in crisis affected environments.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people', what would it be

    The evidence base for education in emergencies and protracted crises needs to be strengthened. Innovative financing is necessary to bridge the enormous financing gap. The Education Cannot Wait Fund could truly transform how education is being financed. Therefore, its establishment should proceed at a firm pace.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement 4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

3G
Address other groups or minorities in crisis settings

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Persons with disabilities face disproportionate risks in crisis situations, therefore it is important to ensure that they are included in all aspects of relief. This requires both mainstreamed and targeted response. The Disability Charter is an important step to ensure that their needs are taken into account in humanitarian response.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In 2016 the EU endorsed the Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action. Through its funding the EU also provides specific support for those affected by disabilities in disaster and crisis-stricken areas.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU continues to engage in dialogue and cooperation with relevant stakeholders concerning the implementation of the Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action and other relevant actions to strengthen the inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Mainstreaming of the inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action requires further strengthening.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In the follow-up to the Summit, the EU is keen to put its commitments into practice and is currently exploring with relevant actors how to take the WHS commitments forward.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disability

  • Specific initiatives

    Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action

4A
Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Launched in 1996, the Disaster Preparedness ECHO programme (DIPECHO) is the core element of EU's global efforts to increase local communities resilience, in which it has thus far invested €325 million. The EU Aid Volunteers initiative was established in 2014 to, inter alia, strengthen the capacity of non-EU based organisations to prepare and respond to humanitarian crises and to improve their volunteer management with a 2020 target to train 4400 people from non-EU disaster-affected countries. The EU has also used development cooperation to support local authorities (LA) on urban planning, local area-based economic development and service delivery.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU supported the START network to enable local actors to respond in anticipation of crises. The DIPECHO programme helped nine disaster-prone regions to increase communities' resilience through training, local early warning systems and contingency planning, stocks of emergency and relief items, and small-scale infrastructure and services. Furthermore, within the EU Aid Volunteers initiative, 66 organisations were involved in the implementation of 6 capacity building projects and 22 organisations in 4 technical assistance projects to strengthen their management and operational systems. In addition, 28 capacity building projects were implemented and signed with Local Authorities (LA) for total amount of €15.8 million. At a country level, €50 million were contracted to support LA as important stakeholder for improving service deliveries to citizens.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU-funded activities reinforced local systems and helped the most vulnerable communities in rural and urban areas to be better prepared for and more resilient to natural hazards. This was achieved by setting up disaster committees, developing contingency plans, early warning systems and evacuation routes, and identifying safe places to evacuate. Projects also promoted coordination between disaster management institutions at all levels, from local to national and supra-national, in order to ensure that legislation is adopted or adapted and budgets are foreseen for preparedness and timely response.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Lack of coordination by local authorities and their insufficient empowerment by the existing administrative system are among the main challenges. Decentralisation has three components: administrative, political and fiscal decentralisation. The administrative and the political components are sometimes in place; however resources and competences are often concentrated in the services of the central government.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to implement DIPECHO programmes. The EU will implement its 2017 work programme of the EU Aid Volunteers initiative. The EU will increase the number of National Associations of Local Authorities supported by the EU's Thematic Budget line and will prepare multi annual programme for 2018-2020 with a stronger focus on cities and urbanisation.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems', what would it be

    It is important to continue supporting local authorities as an important actor of governance, in line with the priorities identified in the European Consensus on Development; concerning all bilateral and other development cooperation instruments.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction People-Centred Approach

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5A - Invest in local capacities

4B
Anticipate, do not wait, for crises

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU played a key role in the negotiations of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). It has also invested in decision-making based on evidence and science. The EU, together with IASC Task Team for Preparedness and Resilience and other partners, developed INFORM - a global, open-source risk assessment for humanitarian crises and disasters, which guides evidence-based, risk-informed and coordinated decisions on the prioritisation of actions, resource allocation, and joint humanitarian-development planning and programmes.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU released an action plan (2016-2020) with 51 actions to implement the Sendai Framework and promote integration of DRR in EU policies. The EU continued to implement its Action Plan for Resilience (APR) in crisis prone countries 2013-2020. The EU supported INFORM: its technical development, additional 5 sub-national models, and the 2017 global results. It consolidated the DRMKC platform providing access to knowledge, partnerships, and channels for innovation. The EU in partnership with UNISDR supported two DRR programmes to: build capacity on disaster loss databases in 12 African countries, share knowledge among 15 countries in 3 regions to integrate DRR and CCA in development planning and public investments. The EU supported its MS to improve their capacity to assess disaster risks, collect and record loss and damage data, and self-assess DRM capability. It contributed to the work of the Executive Committee of the Warsaw Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The online DRMKC platform has become a point of reference to build knowledge and create networks across science and policy in DRM. Activation of the support service determined the level of interest from stakeholders to benefit from this service. Support to partner countries on DRR is continuously monitored, and an independent evaluation started to assess its quality, delivery and impact. The EU will bi-annually monitor the implementation of its Sendai Action Plan. All results are available on INFORM's website. The EU also integrates specific indicators on DRR and resilience, monitors implementation of the EU APR and related EU funded programs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Challenges include: scaling up and cross-sectorial momentum to improve access to DRM knowledge; on DRR programmes, providing the appropriate level of technical support to strengthen national capacities in disaster risk management, and ensure its sustainability; low capacity in some partner countries even when resources are available to invest in capacity building; coherence between various global initiatives (SDGs, Sendai, WHS, Paris agreement, etc.).

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will adopt a new policy framework on resilience and will update the Sendai action plan based on the first monitoring results. Additionally 2 sub-national INFORM models, the INFORM training and guidance package will be completed. The EU will identify activities to improve engagement with the broader DRM community. The evaluation of the EU adaptation strategy will reflect how DRR-CCA synergies can be developed. It is also expected that the risk knowledge will be applied in the processes of main-streaming DRR and CCA in public investment and risk financing.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Anticipate, do not wait, for crises', what would it be

    - Ensure strong coherence between various international processes.
    - Collaborate around shared and agreed priorities.
    - Capacity building requires engaging authorities and their political will as well as clear guidance to all relevant stakeholders, including donors and authorities.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction Innovation

  • Specific initiatives

    Global Partnership for Preparedness Risk and Vulnerability Data Platform

5A
Invest in local capacities

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU has taken coordinated action to address extreme poverty and vulnerability, invest in risk management and build local capacities for pre-emptive and early action. The EU played an important role at the World Humanitarian Summit held in May 2016 and during the negotiations which created the Grand Bargain (GB) and the commitment for signatories to improving aid efficiency and effectiveness. In addition, the EU has invested in local capacities through a dedicated disaster preparedness programme (DIPECHO) and EU Aid Volunteers initiative.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In the context of Grand Bargain work on localisation, the EU provided technical support for the establishment of the localisation marker, in particular regarding parameters on tracking funding flows of local and national responders. The EU's DIPECHO programmes increased local actors' and communities' resilience through training, establishing or improving local early warning systems and contingency planning. DRR was "integrated" into EU humanitarian assistance in 43% of all projects in 2016. The EU used the Enhanced Response Capacity instrument to fund pilot initiatives (e.g. the NEAR network and Demac project) to reduce barriers to direct funding to local responders, promoting partnerships and facilitating their inclusion in the humanitarian system. The EU further built capacity of local staff and volunteers of organisations in countries hit by disasters through its EU Aid Volunteers initiative.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Discussions in the localisation marker Working Group show that there is still a long way to integrate a participatory approach in the process. Despite calls for broader participation and consultation (including online consultations), local and national actors are still under-represented in a process which is critical for the success of localisation. This shows that more effort still need to be made to bring change in mindset within the humanitarian system.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU will continue to engage in discussions on localised response in the context of Grand Bargain. The EU will implement its 2017 work programme of the EU Aid Volunteers initiative.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction People-Centred Approach

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems 5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

5B
Invest according to risk

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU has invested in evidence and risk-based decision-making, including by supporting INFORM (global, open-source risk assessment) and the DRM Knowledge Centre. Disaster risk financing is one of priorities in the EU Resilience Action Plan and the EU Sendai Action Plan. As example in this area the EU development cooperation thematic program Global Public Goods and Challenges supports 3 programmes, namely the ACP-EU Natural Disaster Reduction Programme (as of 2011, covering ACP countries), the Africa Disaster Risk Financing (ADRF) Programme (launched in 2014) and the Partnership for Disaster Risk Financing Analytics (started in 2016).

  • Achievements at a glance

    See also self-report on transformation 4B. Under the ACP-EU NDRR Programme, at least 13 ACP countries benefited from technical assistance to develop disaster risk financing and insurance strategies, through national or regional level. The main achievements so far are in the Pacific, the Caribbean and Indian Ocean Community. The Africa DRF Program started work on identifying risk financing needs and priorities, and defining work programs in 12 African countries. 5 multiple-hazard country risk profiles, analytical studies for 2 countries, disaster risk financing diagnostics reports in 4 countries, and a Understanding Risk and Finance Conference (Nov 2016), attended by 450 participants. To date the ADRF trained about 200 people in risk financing. The recently-started Disaster Risk Financing Analytics partnership initiated the development of a suite of standardized “parent” disaster risk financing analytics decision-making tools that will be piloted in 3 countries.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Under the 3 programs, progress is monitored through a monitoring framework developed specifically for each program. The monitoring frameworks allow to assess the progress made by each program against the targets, outcomes and outputs specifically agreed between the EC and the World Bank/GFDRR, before the launch of the programs. The monitoring frameworks are updated every six months, and achievements presented in the programs’ related Steering Committees.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Given the differing needs and priorities of countries across the region, each country progresses at its own pace. The policy area of disaster risk financing is largely a new one in Africa, therefore the program includes both key activities that are similar across countries and activities addressing specific needs expressed by governments. In the Pacific, the Caribbean and Central America where the risk financing agenda is much more advanced, the main challenges are now to deepen the implementation of the risk financing strategies, to scale up the insurance coverage of the countries and to enhance and leverage achievements ...

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The ADRF program will continue the implementation of ongoing activities aiming at creating the enabling environment for risk financing, formulating risk financing priorities in the 12 countries and beyond, and facilitating risk financing knowledge sharing. In other regions of the World such as South East Asia, preparatory work still needs to be undertaken to start developing risk financing solutions to countries that have important exposure and vulnerabilities to disasters.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction Innovation

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4B - Anticipate, do not wait, for crises

5D
Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The EU implemented programs under multi-year planning and funding strategies in relation to Disaster Preparedness (DP), Enhanced Response Capacity (ERC) and Children of Peace - Education. With the launch of the Grand Bargain negotiations, in which the EU was a committed participant, multi-year planning and funding was one of the ten work streams selected as having serious potential for increased efficiency and effectiveness, resulting in better delivery to beneficiaries. As such, the EU is working on expanding its multi-year planning and funding strategies and allocations.

  • Achievements at a glance

    As a result of the Grand Bargain discussions, the EU launched exploratory work to expand its multi-year planning and funding strategies, as it has large potential for efficiency and effectiveness gains in terms of enabling reduced costs of implementation, preparedness and early-warning and linking humanitarian and development programming innovative ways of working.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Change of programming practice (planning and funding) including assessment of cost efficiency and effectiveness due to the award of multi-year grants.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Without prejudice to the final decision to be made on moving towards multi-year planning and funding, the following challenges can be expected:
    1) Operationalization of multi-year strategies whilst ensuring flexibility within multi-year grants, to adapt to changing humanitarian context and/or needs,
    2) Balancing annual budgetary allocations from central authorities with multi-year funding allocations to partners, and
    3) Ensuring multi-year funding allocations are 'downstreamed' from first recipient to implementing partner, so as maximize efficiency and effectiveness gains.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    1) Determining how multi-year planning and funding can be further operationalized in DG ECHO's humanitarian programming,
    2) Working together with DG ECHO partners on developing best practices in multi-year funding and planning, especially in connection with ongoing work on humanitarian-development nexus, early warning/preparedness and localization agenda,
    3) Working together with other donors, in the context of GHD, on developing best practices through case studies/research initiated by Canada/FAO and others.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction Social Protection

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides 5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

5E
Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    A solid evidence base confirms that cash-based assistance can be an efficient means of delivering humanitarian assistance, which needs to be scaled-up. Cash offers dignity, choice and flexibility for beneficiaries; it is about greater efficiency, value for money and ultimately improved effectiveness for donors and taxpayers. A multi-purpose (cash) response means doing things differently, through joined up programming of assistance, joint assessments, coordination of actors and coordinated targeting. The best response is well-designed and context specific, selecting the most appropriate modality (or combination of modalities) for the situation.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The EU adopted Common Principles for Multi-Purpose Cash-Based Assistance to respond to Humanitarian Needs, subsequently endorsing them at political level through Council Conclusions. The principles were developed to guide donors and humanitarian partners on how best to work with multi-purpose assistance and make the link with longer term resilience building and national social protection systems. Cash based assistance was the key component of the EU's largest ever single operation - the contribution to the ESSN (Emergency Social Safety Net) in Turkey. In January 2017, the EU issued Guidance to partners on how to implement medium and large-scale cash transfer programmes. In order to improve transparency, the EU published data giving full details of activities to the IATI standard on a monthly basis. The EU also strengthened outreach to the private sector, calling for its increased engagement in using their comparative advantage to address growing humanitarian needs.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The EU improved data gathering according to each delivery modality. Since the second half of 2016, proposals need to differentiate by delivery modality and identify the amount of the transfer reaching the beneficiary. The EU continues to advocate with partners to consider a cash response in all cases and to provide suitable justification for the choice of delivery modality. The EU is externally assessed both by the Publish What You Fund "Aid Transparency Index" and the transparency monitoring of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC).

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Scaling up cash-based assistance beyond current levels is certainly possible. However, the availability of financial service operators or a means to delivery mobile money is needed to make delivery more secure and efficient. Not every context lends itself to this and staff and implementing partners need to become familiar with the technological and financial tools that are necessary when working with cash and to systematically consider cash alongside other delivery options. In terms of transparency, internal management systems are not all configured for IATI requirements.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The EU aims to deliver 35% of its humanitarian assistance in the form of cash-based assistance in 2017. Efforts will be made to obtain a better understanding of where and why different modalities are used, with a view to identifying opportunities to scale up the use of cash transfers in all areas and across all sectors. Implementation of the Guidance Note on cash will ensure that the cash delivery elements of medium and large programmes can be isolated with a view to harnessing maximum efficiencies. To improve transparency, the EU will include more detailed information in IATI publications.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency', what would it be

    Cash transfers are an appropriate response across sectors. Efforts need to be made to scale up the use of cash, in particular where a response involves the need for goods or for services which can be accessed through a payment.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Cash Private Sector

  • Specific initiatives

    Charter for Change The Connecting Business initiative

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

Attachments

  • Self report attachment
    4A | Disaster Risk Reduction, Humanitarian Principles | Regional Organisations Humanitarian Action network (ROHAN)
  • Self report attachment
    4C | Food Security, People-Centred Approach, Social Protection
  • Self report attachment
    4B | Private Sector