Progress Report

The self-report below is organized according to the 24 transformations of the Agenda for Humanity. It is based on commitments pledged at the time of report submission. Click on the 'Expand' symbol to expand each section and read the reporting inputs by transformation.

1B
Act early

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Current humanitarian emergencies provide a stark reminder that crises are overwhelmingly driven by conflict, broken politics and instability. To achieve lasting solutions and prevent crises in the future, bilateral and multilateral actors must continue to improve delivery in fragile states to tackle the drivers of conflict and instability.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK is pushing for change across the UN system to deliver greater coherence, improved planning and analysis, and resourcing of the right capabilities. The UK has been the primary funder of the new Strategic Planning and Analysis Unit since its creation two years ago and we are keen that it is institutionally empowered under UN Secretary-General Guterres to coordinate UN decision-making. The UK contributes to the UN Peacebuilding Fund providing support before a conflict escalates; we contribute to the Department for Political Affairs to strengthen mediation and support the deployment of Peace and Development Advisers through a joint UNDP-DPA initiative to strengthen the capacity of UN Country Teams on the ground.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK will lead reforms to the UN system in part by engaging in conversations with bilateral and multilateral partners to assess progress that has been made since the 2015 Peacebuilding Architecture Review. The UK is keen to ensure momentum is maintained in this area. The upcoming reviews and reports from the Secretary-General will provide further evidence and specific measures of progress. In addition, the Sustainable Development Goals, and in particular Goal 16, provide key measures to assess whether milestones towards more effective conflict prevention are being achieved.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Lack of political will to take early action continues to be a major obstacle in progressing this transformation area. Meaningful change requires a greater focus on information sharing, persuading the UN Security Council to respond to risks and a coherent approach. Where a response is underway, too often it suffers from inadequate planning, lack of joint assessments and poor coordination within the UN system.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    With the new Secretary General and debates in the UN Security Council and UN General Assembly, political momentum has developed for the concept of sustaining peace and encouraging early action. The UK is engaging widely, including through the Mexican-led Friends of Sustaining Peace group.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Act early', what would it be

    The biggest constraints on early action are fundamentally political and cannot be completely solved through institutional reforms or more money. To achieve lasting solutions and prevent crises in the future, bilateral and multilateral actors must seize opportunities to tackle underlying causes of conflict.

  • Specific initiatives

    Commitment to Action: Transcending the humanitarian - development divide The Peace Promise

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1B - Act early

1C
Remain engaged and invest in stability

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The 2015 UK Strategic Defence & Security Review makes clear the central role of development assistance in addressing the great challenges of our time, including mass migration, modern slavery, disease and terrorism. The achievement of development results alone is insufficient to reduce instability and violence and in addition, we need to make choices to help countries and communities to manage change peacefully. The UK has adopted an integrated approach to tackling instability, increasing well-targeted development assistance in fragile states and regions, and pushing for more effective performance of the UN and World Bank in these contexts.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK has committed to an increase of funding for the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) from £1.033 billion in 2015/16 to over £1.3 billion by 2019/20, and are on track to reach this target. The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund works to strengthen peace and resilience in countries at risk of conflict and instability. It is intended to deliver a whole-of-government approach to conflict prevention, stabilisation and crisis response.

    In addition, the UK is implementing its Building Stability Framework which includes ensuring development programming address root causes of conflict. This means working in the right places, putting politics first, thinking and acting beyond the state, seeing stability through the whole portfolio and managing risk and return flexibly. This is complemented by the UK commitment to invest 50% of DFID's budget in fragile states and regions - which remains on track.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK closely monitors CSSF spending and systems are in place to assess the amount of resources spent in fragile states and regions. We have so far met the annual milestones and are on track to achieve the target.

    Additionally, CSSF and DFID programming are subject to regular scrutiny, assessing progress against objectives of building stability. An example of this work is the mentoring and training of over 11,000 Lebanese soldiers in urban counter-terrorism by 2019. Teams are required to outline in their business plans how their overall portfolio will contribute to building stability more widely. This is assessed annually.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Addressing the root causes of conflict requires significant behavioral and resource shifts. An unclear evidence base lends itself to trial and error. Additional resources in more complex environments require greater safeguards, increased expertise and often higher management time.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    While implementation is ongoing within UK systems, we need to invest in developing the right capabilities and continue to build up the evidence of what works, including through case studies of our own programming. Simultaneously, the UK has a key role to play in influencing partners to consider their own approaches and work closely with multilateral partners to improve their effectiveness in fragile states and regions.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Remain engaged and invest in stability', what would it be

    The biggest constraints on successful conflict prevention are fundamentally political and cannot be completely solved through institutional reforms or more money. To achieve lasting solutions and prevent crises in the future, bilateral and multilateral actors must seize opportunities to tackle underlying causes of conflict.

  • Specific initiatives

    Commitment to Action: Transcending the humanitarian - development divide The Peace Promise

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1C - Remain engaged and invest in stability

1D
Develop solutions with and for people

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK's support to local and national NGOs through the START Network, Disasters and Emergencies Preparedness Programme and the Humanitarian Leadership Academy ensures we build local and national capacity and get funds to national and local actors. The UK also demonstrates its commitment to local capabilities through core funding to the IFRC, which builds the capacity of National Societies.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK is continuing to invest in these consortia that are working with local and national partners:
    I) The START network of national NGOs alongside international NGOs (£30 million, 3 year programme agreed until 2018) provides rapid support to forgotten, or spikes in, humanitarian crises. 42% of START funding in 2015/16 went to local and national partners.
    II) The Disasters Emergency Preparedness Programme (DEPP, £40 million, 3 year programme agreed to 2018) implemented by START Network NGOs and comprises 14 projects investing in the capacity development of national and local NGOs.
    III) The Humanitarian Leadership Academy (HLA, £20 million, 5 year programme agreed to 2020) investing in training and learning for local and national NGOs.
    IIII) Core funding to IFRC (£9 million in 2016/17)

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The START fund provides an annual report that includes the amount of funding going directly for implementation by national and local partners. The DEPP partners (14 projects) report quarterly on progress and the overall ouputs and outcomes of the programme are recorded and assessed in a logframe and a yearly public annual report. HLA also reports quarterly and annually on progress. IFRC reports annually against its results framework

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Challenges include measuring the effects of, and ensuring the sustainability, of national and local capacity development programmes.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In 2017 we will be focusing on the continued development of the three programmes. The START Fund will continue to record funds being implemented by national and local actors, and the DEPP and HLA will continue to implement capacity development activities of national and local actors. DFID is also developing a new business case to provide continued support to the IFRC.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Accountability to affected people People-Centred Approach

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

2A
Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Protecting civilians is at the core of the UK’s policies to prevent, manage and resolve conflicts around the world. The UK is the 'lead' nation in the Security Council on the protection of civilians agenda. With UK leadership and support, the UN Security Council has increased its commitment to this agenda in recent years.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK has supported or led on a number of thematic Security Council resolutions on protection issues, such as the Protection of Medical Facilities in 2016. We commissioned research and facilitated dialogue between states [by Chatham House] on the scope for strengthened, principled engagement with non-state armed groups for humanitarian purposes.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Using our permanent seat in the UN Security Council, the UK advocates for the protection of people in crises, including medical personnel and facilities and humanitarian personnel and assets.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Encouraging states to respect International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law, to consider new initiatives for strengthening accountability, and to cooperate with international bodies such as International Criminal Court (ICC) in holding alleged perpetrators to account. It is also important that the international community as a whole ensures that adequate resources are available to the ICC and tribunals whilst also encouraging greater efficiency and effectiveness of the courts and tribunals.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2A - Respect and protect civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of hostilities

2B
Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK wants to encourage greater compliance with IHL by making this commitment. The UK has a long history of providing humanitarian action that is quick, efficient and appropriate, but no humanitarian action can be effective without free and unfettered access to those in need and guaranteed safety and security for those providing assistance.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK continues to champion UN Security Council resolutions 2175, 2286 and 2271 at every opportunity. We continue to advocate for the Centrality of Protection in humanitarian action, requiring humanitarian partners to address protection, and engage in risk analysis and planning in every humanitarian context.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    Informally through events on the ground in those situationas where we are present.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Continued lack of compliance with IHL

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions', what would it be

    Continue to stress the importance of compliance with IHL

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2B - Ensure full access to and protection of the humanitarian and medical missions

2C
Speak out on violations

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK is committed to a rules-based international order and to ending impunity for the most serious crimes of international concern by holding perpetrators to account and achieving justice for victims.

  • Achievements at a glance

    In 2016, the UK contributed more than £11 million to international criminal tribunals, including the International Criminal Court and tribunals covering former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Lebanon, Cambodia and Sierra Leone. In September 2016 at the UN General Assembly, the UK launched a global campaign to Bring Daesh to Justice. In December 2016 the UK co-sponsored an UN General Assembly resolution establishing an International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism to assist the investigation and prosecution of atrocity crimes in Syria. The UK also contributed to consultations with states on the ICRC/Swiss initiative to strengthening compliance with International Humanitarian Law (IHL). In December 2016, the UK candidate Dr. Robin McNeill Love was elected to the International Humanitarian Fact-Finding Commission.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK demonstrates vocal and concrete support for a rules-based international system, including support for international criminal tribunals and compliance with international humanitarian law.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Encouraging states to respect International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law, to consider new initiatives for strengthening accountability, and to cooperate with international bodies such as the International Criminal Court (ICC) in holding alleged perpetrators to account. It is also important that the international community as a whole ensures that adequate resources are available to the ICC and tribunals whilst also encouraging greater efficiency and effectiveness of the courts and tribunals.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Continued support for tribunals, including new mechanisms such as the Syria International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM) and Bringing Daesh to Justice campaign. Ongoing consultations on strengthening respect for IHL.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2C - Speak out on violations

2D
Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The promotion and full implementation of international humanitarian law (IHL) is a high priority for the UK. We take our own obligations very seriously and encourage all states and non-state actors engaged in armed conflict to respect and act in accordance with IHL.

    The UK has been a global leader in supporting women and girls, including inaugurating the Call to Action to Prevent Gender Based Violence in Emergencies.

    The UK is committed to a rules-based international order and to ending impunity for the most serious crimes of international concern by holding perpetrators to account and achieving justice for victims.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK continues to support international bodies, such as the International Criminal Court, in holding alleged perpetrators to account. This includes UK Ministerial attendance at the Assembly of States Parties in The Hague 2016.

    The UK has provided funding to support UN efforts on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) - £200,000 to fund the UN Secretary-General’s Special Coordinator for SEA and £555,000 to enable the Department of Field Support’s Conduct and Discipline Unit to enhance pre-deployment vetting and training. The UK has also agreed to fund a £245,000 communications strategy which will increase awareness within communities of how to report SEA allegations within communities.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK continues to not vote against credible draft resolutions on timely and decisive action to end the commission of genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes.

    The UK has invested £25 million in pioneering What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) programme to drive innovation and generate evidence that can be used to inform future interventions. £5 million of this has been earmarked for humanitarian emergencies and a study on the use of the IASC GBV Guidelines in the response to Typhoon Haiyan has been completed and studies are underway in conflict-affected communities.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The decisions by South Africa and Burundi to withdraw from the Rome Statute. The UK has engaged in dialogue regarding the concerns raised by some African States regarding the Rome Statute.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The UK remains dedicated to working with all Governments and civil society to support the rule of law and the ICC as the key institution in the fight against impunity of the most serious crimes. Continued work on Universality of the Rome Statute with EU and other partners. Continued active participation in ICC working groups and the ICC bureau. 2018 budget process and negotiations – continuing drive for efficiencies.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Gender

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2D - Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability

2E
Uphold the rules: a global campaign to affirm the norms that safeguard humanity

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK remains committed to strengthening respect for international humanitarian law (IHL) - Resolution 2 of the 32nd International Conference of the ICRC is essential to ensure IHL remains relevant and is dealt with in appropriate international fora.

    Ratification of the 1954 Hague Convention and Protocols has been a long-term commitment of successive governments. The destruction of cultural property that the world has witnessed in recent years was further motivation. The UK's ratification and accession to the Convention and Protocols sends a strong message of the UK's commitment to protecting the world's cultural property.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Resolution 2 - UK has actively supported the state-led, ICRC and Government of Switzerland-facilitated, process to strengthen respect for, and enhance the implementation of, IHL.

    The Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Act received Royal Assent on 23 February 2017. The Act will enable the UK to meet its obligations under the Convention and Protocols. The Second Protocol is being laid before Parliament as required by the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (2010). Once completed, we can progress procedures for depositing instruments of ratification and accession.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    In order to assess and monitor progress made on Resolution 2 of the 32nd International Conference of the ICRC - two formal meetings will be held in 2017, two in 2018 and one in 2019.

    The UK have been utilizing a number of project management tools to measure progress towards ratification/accession of the 1954 Hague Convention. The main success to date has been the successful and timely passage of the Bill. Ultimate success will be measured when ratification and accession takes place.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    There have been continued difficulties in reaching consensus amongst states on Resolution 2.

    Hague Convention - Timeline for introducing the Bill was particularly compressed, but other than that, no major challenges. Our military already adhere to the principles of the Convention and Protocols.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The next formal meeting of states on Resolution 2 takes place on 10-12 April 2017. These three days will be dedicated to examining a paper on existing IHL mechanisms and the functions and features of a potential forum of States to strengthen respect for IHL.

    In addition the UK will be looking to finalise the categories of UK's cultural property eligible for general protection and refine policy on use of cultural emblem and the administration of authorising use.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Humanitarian Principles

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2E - Uphold the rules: a global campaign to affirm the norms that safeguard humanity

3A
Reduce and address displacement

Individual Commitment

Joint Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The commitments strongly align with UK priorities. DFID’s 2016 Bilateral Development Review calls for a new approach to protracted conflict and refugee crises. At the Syria Conference in London, the UK showed commitment to this through the Jordan and Lebanon Compacts, which provide opportunities for sustainable livelihoods and access to essential services for displaced people and host communities. The Wilton Park Forum helped secure consensus on the need for a new approach to protracted forced displacement, and agreed principles for delivering better outcomes for refugees and host communities.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Building on the Jordan and Lebanon Compacts, in 2016 the UK pledged £80 million support for the Ethiopia jobs compact supporting economic development by creating 100,000 new jobs for both Ethiopians and refugees. The UK played a leading role in securing an additional $2 billion to support low income refugee hosting countries through the World Bank International Development Association (IDA)-18 replenishment. The UK is the largest donor to the Education Cannot Wait fund, pledging £30 million to help over 4.5 million children receive a better education over the next two years. DFID is actively supporting UNHCR to pilot the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF).

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    DFID is monitoring progress on the Jordan, Lebanon and Ethiopia compacts. IDA-18’s implementation will be monitored by a Result Measurement System and a Mid-Term Review, which we expect to include an assessment on the refugee sub window. DFID’s Secretary of State sits on the High Level Steering Group for the Education Cannot Wait fund, which agrees the overarching results framework and approach to independent evaluation. Under Grand Bargain reporting DFID will track our own multi-year funding and how these commitments are being passed onto implementing partners.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    No major obstacles encountered. Improved humanitarian/development linkages, including the refugee compacts, requires a change of behaviour to facilitate greater coordination between donors, host governments, humanitarian and development actors, and 'new' stakeholders including the private sector.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Lessons learnt on the refugee compacts will be shared widely within DFID. DFID will continue to proactively engage with UNHCR and other stakeholders to support successful implementation of the CRRF. On the IDA-18, DFID is working closely with the World Bank to support their field missions, which will inform effective use of the sub-window, going live in July 2017. Education Cannot Wait is tracking results and gathering lessons to improve its next cycle of programming for refugees and IDPs. The Lebanon cash programme is planned to start in April 2017.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reduce and address displacement', what would it be

    In situations of protracted displacement, new approaches need to combine humanitarian, development, and peace-building expertise to both meet immediate needs, as well as reduce over time the needs of chronically extreme vulnerable populations, including refugees, IDPs and the communities that host them.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement

3C
End statelessness in the next decade

Joint Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    This commitment strongly aligns with UK priorities. DFID’s 2016 Bilateral Development Review calls for a new approach to protracted conflict and refugee crises. At the London Syria Conference, the UK showed commitment to this through the Jordan and Lebanon Compacts, which provide opportunities for sustainable livelihoods and access to essential services for displaced people and host communities. The Wilton Park Forum helped secure consensus on the need for a new approach to protracted forced displacement, and agreed principles for delivering better outcomes for refugees and host communities.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Building on the Jordan and Lebanon Compacts, in 2016 the UK pledged £80 million support for the Ethiopia jobs compact supporting economic development by creating 100,000 new jobs for both Ethiopians and refugees. The UK played a leading role in securing an additional $2 billion to support low income refugee hosting countries through the World Bank International Development Association (IDA)-18 replenishment. The UK is the largest donor to the Education Cannot Wait fund, pledging £30 million to help over 4.5 million children receive a better education over the next two years. DFID is actively supporting UNHCR to pilot the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF).

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    DFID is monitoring progress on the Jordan, Lebanon and Ethiopia compacts. IDA-18’s implementation will be monitored by a Result Measurement System and a Mid-Term Review, which we expect to include an assessment on the refugee sub-window. DFID’s Secretary of State sits on the High Level Steering Group for the Education Cannot Wait fund, which agrees the overarching results framework and approach to independent evaluation. Under Grand Bargain reporting DFID will track our own multi-year funding and how these commitments are being passed onto implementing partners.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    No major obstacles encountered. Improved humanitarian/development linkages, including the refugee compacts, requires a change of behaviour to facilitate greater coordination between donors, host governments, humanitarian and development actors, and 'new' stakeholders including the private sector.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    Lessons learnt on the refugee compacts will be shared widely within DFID. DFID will continue to proactively engage with UNHCR and other stakeholders to support successful implementation of the CRRF. On the IDA-18, DFID is working closely with the World Bank to support their field missions, which will inform effective use of the sub-window, going live in July 2017. Education Cannot Wait is tracking results and gathering lessons to improve its next cycle of programming for refugees and IDPs. The Lebanon cash programme is planned to start in April 2017.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'End statelessness in the next decade', what would it be

    In situations of protracted displacement, new approaches need to combine humanitarian, development, and peace-building expertise to both meet immediate needs, as well as reduce over time the needs of chronically extreme vulnerable populations, including refugees, IDPs and the communities that host them.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3A - Reduce and address displacement 3C - End statelessness in the next decade

3D
Empower and protect women and girls

Individual Commitment

Joint Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK has been a global leader in supporting women and girls, including inaugurating the Call to Action to Prevent Gender Based Violence (GBV) in Emergencies. We want to ensure that gender remains at the forefront of humanitarian policy and action, and that empowerment and participation are centralised, rather than women only being regarded as victims or beneficiaries. The UK wants to promote accountability for humanitarian actors to deliver for women and girls, and change the approach to programming to make it more gender responsive.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK has made it clear that all our humanitarian work must include consideration of gender equality, and continue to use the Gender Equality Act mandated by Parliament to drive accountability. Of our key humanitarian risk assessment tools, INFORM now includes a gender inequality index, and ACAPS' country profiles include both gender equality and protection.

    In South Sudan we invested in a 4 year programme to assist GBV survivors. By the end of 2016, 100% of Gender Based Violence survivors identified were provided with appropriate case management.

    For 2016/17 we contributed new funding of $1.9 million to the Global Acceleration Instrument on Women, Peace and Security, including successful women-led conflict mediation in Burundi.

    We endorsed the Joint Statement on Sexual and Reproductive Health in Emergencies. We have developed internal guidance and built networks between our sexual and reproductive health and rights and humanitarian partners.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    We are following up on each individual commitment made. Programming commitments include monitoring and evaluation reports and annual reviews to ensure our funding is well spent. We include requirements relating to gender and to sexual violence for our largest humanitarian funding recipients, and additionally use the Gender Equality Act (2014) to ensure that gender equality is considered in everything that DFID funds. For the Global Acceleration Instrument (GAI) we sit on the GAI working group to ensure funds are going to the most needed places.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    As we committed to scale up our Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) programming in some of the most difficult operating environments, access and sustainability is challenging. We respond to this by maximising our relationships with partners.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    -Continue to push for and promote gender equality in humanitarian action throughout our internal and external engagements and policy, such as including sexual violence in our multilateral business cases.
    -Continue to implement programmes on VAWG/SRHR in protracted crises, and step up livelihoods and empowerment components in South Sudan.
    -Our £8 million contribution to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women will continue to provide grants to women's rights organisations.
    -Reaching women and girls in emergencies will be a theme within the Summit on family planning which the Secretary of State will co-host with UNFPA and the Gates Foundation.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Empower and protect women and girls', what would it be

    Ensuring that funding and political will is sustained is vital for making sure this transformation is not de-prioritized.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Cash Gender People-Centred Approach

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    2D - Take concrete steps to improve compliance and accountability 3D - Empower and protect women and girls

3E
Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Two main factors drove our engagement in Education Cannot Wait (ECW): evidence of a severe shortfall of funding for education in emergencies and the lack of a single coordinated mechanism to bring partners together to deliver quality education in crises. We wanted to be a key actor in establishing a Fund for Education in Emergencies, investing in it and galvanising advocacy and action.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK has committed £30 million to ECW, with initial investments aiming to deliver education programming to children in Chad, Yemen and Syria, as well as Ethiopia. Education Cannot Wait has built solid foundations, with the UK and other partners supporting the Fund to develop from scratch a full results framework, operational design and governance structure.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK is fully engaged in the design of the Fund, which includes a full Results Framework for ECW's investments. Since the WHS, an operational framework, setting out details of ECW's funding mechanisms, has been developed. Governance arrangements have been designed and circa. $48 million have already been received into the ECW account. Initial investments have been decided as Chad, Yemen, Syria and possibly Ethiopia. Once these investments are operational, ECW will use the Results Framework to monitor outputs.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The biggest challenge is also one of ECW's biggest sucesses - it is creating something new and untested, and this requires a considerable amount of resource. Given that ECW is working across humanitarian and development actors, it also requires a huge amount of coordination and a balance of views to achieve something that works for all stakeholders, not least the beneficiaries.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    - Ensure that operational capacity is increased and that initial investments are begun as soon as possible in order to deliver education to children without delay.
    - Mobilizing more resources, including from non-traditional donors.
    - Prioritising measuring of quality education, including ensuring schools are safe places where children are protected.
    - Begin building a better evidence base.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people', what would it be

    Energy, patience, commitment, and collaboration, whilst always bearing in mind the end goal of reaching more children with education: something asked for by children and parents living through humanitarian crises, and yet so often overlooked.

  • Specific initiatives

    Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3E - Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people

3F
Enable adolescents and young people to be agents of positive transformation

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    In the changing humanitarian landscape, children and young people are increasingly at risk due to the effects of conflict, natural disaster, displacement and instability. Over 600 million young people live in fragile or conflict affected areas, and young people make up a third of those displaced by disasters. The UK continues to believe in the importance of working with and for young people to keep them safe.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The needs of children and young people are mainstreamed across our humanitarian, protracted crises and development portfolio. ‘Education Cannot Wait’ will ensure that millions more children and young people can access education, even in the toughest of circumstances such as camps. The ambition is big – the fund aims to raise up to $1.5 billion a year by 2020, reaching over 13 million children, transforming the way the world deals with education in emergencies and crisis. The UK has committed £30 million to support this initiative. We are funding youth-led participatory research into the effect of protracted crises on young people's transition to adulthood in Jordan and Uganda, the findings of which will inform our protracted crises agenda. Increasingly, our humanitarian programming addresses the particular needs of girls and boys, young men and women.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK's work with and for young people is mainstreamed across our humanitarian, protracted crises and development portfolio. We have not yet developed a separate indicator to track progress.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    - The internal silos between humanitarian, protracted crises and development programming.
    - Scale of need across all areas of humanitarian response.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    A more cohesive approach to working with and for young people in humanitarian action, bringing together disaster response, work in protracted crises, and resilience building to work better for children and young people.

  • Specific initiatives

    The Compact for Young People in Humanitarian Action Education Cannot Wait

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3E - Eliminate gaps in education for children, adolescents and young people 3F - Enable adolescents and young people to be agents of positive transformation

3G
Address other groups or minorities in crisis settings

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    An estimated 800 million people in developing countries have a disability. We cannot end poverty without reaching people with disabilities; and therefore the UK is looking to become the global leader in this neglected and under-prioritised area. The UK is committed to reaching the poorest and most excluded people; creating jobs, strengthening global peace and security and promoting global prosperity. Therefore, we will ensure people with disabilities are consistently included in, and benefit from, international aid and humanitarian assistance, can access a quality education and productive employment and no longer face stigma and discrimination.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK reaffirms our determination to make humanitarian action inclusive of persons with disabilities. We are doing strong work and we will build on this:
    - The Girls Education Challenge supports over 34,000 girls with disabilities to access an education in Kenya and Uganda.
    - Through UK Aid Direct, Motivation UK provides emergency wheelchairs to injured and disabled people in humanitarian crises.
    - We are providing up to 300 small grants over the next three years to support disabled peoples organisations across the world.
    - We support the control of neglected diseases, vaccination and strengthening health systems, which help to prevent or reduce the impact of disabilities.
    - DFID spends approximately £30m over five years on disability inclusion through centrally managed programmes.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    We are amending DFID’s internal systems, and working with the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) so that in the future we and the international community can better track and monitor disability spending.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    By May 2017, the UK will launch a new disability inclusion programme to build critical evidence to deliver jobs, support people living with psycho-social disabilities, tackle stigma and discrimination and provide support in conflict and humanitarian settings.

    We will significantly increase the number, and ambition, of disability inclusive programming across DFID. We will deliver improved and targeted programming that supports people with disabilities to have a voice, access a quality education and gain productive employment.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disability

  • Specific initiatives

    Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    3G - Address other groups or minorities in crisis settings

4A
Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK views radical reform as necessary for the humanitarian system to be better able to meet the needs of crisis-affected people - this includes delivering the Grand Bargain and advancing humanitarian/development linkages. Cash is a key part of the UK's vision for humanitarian reform. The High Level Panel on Humanitarian Cash and the Study on the 'Drivers and Inhibitors of Change in the humanitarian system' (2016, Gppi) found that cash remains underutilised in humanitarian responses, while evidence is in place to support a cash scale up.

  • Achievements at a glance

    UK has been providing leadership to the humanitarian sector as co-convener of the Grand Bargain cash workstream with WFP and co-chair of the Good Humanitarian Donorship cash workstream with Norway. Workplans have been completed for both workstreams and cash events are planned. UK is creating incentives for the scale up of cash (through UK's core funding to UN and Red Cross Movement Agencies and in country offices; including the promotion of new models). UK continues investing in evidence.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The DFID baseline on the use of cash within total humanitarian funding for fiscal year 2015/2016 was established at the end of 2016. The development of internal markers to measure systematically the use of cash in DFID funded has been initiated.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The humanitarian sector needs commonly agreed definition for cash based assistance and a commonly agreed set of markers to measure the volume and the value for money of different types of transfers (cash, vouchers, in-kind).

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    The UK will continue working with respective co-chairs on the Grand Bargain and Good Humanitarian Donorship cash workstreams. UK will keep supporting the increased use of cash programming based on evidence, including the promotion of new models.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems', what would it be

    Delivery of cash commitments and in particular increased use and coordination of cash will require concerted efforts (e.g. agreement on definitions, efficiency and effectiveness markers).

  • Cross cutting issues

    Cash

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systems 5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

4B
Anticipate, do not wait, for crises

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Effective risk management and preparedness contributes directly to the success of UK priorities: strengthening resilience and response to crises as well as to tackle extreme poverty and help the world’s most vulnerable. Climate change is a global challenge that requires a global response. It is one of the biggest threats to our national and economic security and we need to act now in order to avoid more detrimental and costly effects in the future.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK provides up to £500,000 over three years for an international, multi-stakeholder index for risk management (InfoRM). We use the index to support early warning and resource allocation processes. The two largest humanitarian donors, US and ECHO, are using INFORM to support the allocation of their budgets, meaning INFORM is influencing over £6.81 billion of humanitarian funding.

    In addition over the last 5 years, UK climate finance investments in developing countries through DFID, BEIS and DEFRA have supported 21 million people to cope with the effects of climate change, improved access to clean energy for 6.6 million people and reduced or avoided 4.9 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. This includes being a founding donor of several insurance initiatives, including African Risk Capacity, which pools risk regionally to offer lower-cost insurance and provides advice and assistance to governments around insurance and risk finance.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    We monitor international climate finance spending on a regular basis.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4B - Anticipate, do not wait, for crises 5B - Invest according to risk

4C
Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

Individual Commitment

Joint Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Systemic and radical change is needed to reform the international humanitarian response to protracted crises and displacement, taking into account that 50% of the worlds population live in urban settings. The UK is committed to a new approach to crises, which will involve innovation and a 'whole of aid' approach.

  • Achievements at a glance

    At the US Leaders’ Refugee Summit in September 2016 in New York, the Prime Minister announced £80 million in support for the Ethiopia jobs compact – an agreement with the Government of Ethiopia, the World Bank, European Investment Bank and the EU to create 100,000 new jobs for Ethiopians and refugees - a whole of aid approach.

    In December 2016, a record $75 billion was committed for the World Bank International Development Association (IDA) 18 replenishment, with $2 billion allocated for support to low income refugee hosting countries. The UK played a leading role in securing agreement on this.

    The UK has a £3.5m Urban Crises programme with the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and the International Institute for Environment and Development. Through this programme IRC, with UK support, has taken on a leading role in the establishment and interim management of the Global Alliance for Urban Crises.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK has been undertaking an internal review to assess our approach to protracted conflict and refugee settings, the outcomes of which will be shared widely internally and externally, and will be used to help leverage changes in the UK and international response to protracted crises. We have also developed a Building Stability Framework, a Bilateral Development Review, and a new Economic Development strategy, which all call for a more integrated approach involving humanitarian, development, and peace-building expertise.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Internal Displacement Refugees

  • Specific initiatives

    Global Alliance for Urban Crises

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development divides

5A
Invest in local capacities

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The UK's support to local and national NGOs through the START Network, Disasters and Emergencies Preparedness Programme and the Humanitarian Leadership Academy ensures we build local and national capacity and get funds to national and local actors. The UK also demonstrates its commitment to local capabilities through core funding to the IFRC, which builds the capacity of National Societies.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK is continuing to invest in these consortia that are working with local and national partners:
    I) The START network of national NGOs alongside international NGOs (£30 million, 3 year programme agreed until 2018) provides rapid support to forgotten, or spikes in, humanitarian crises. 42% of START funding in 2015/16 went to local and national partners.
    II) The Disasters Emergency Preparedness Programme (DEPP, £40 million, 3 year programme agreed to 2018) implemented by START Network NGOs and comprises 14 projects investing in the capacity development of national and local NGOs.
    III) The Humanitarian Leadership Academy (HLA, £20million, 5 year programme agreed to 2020) investing in training and learning for local and national NGOs.
    IIII) Core funding to IFRC (£9 million in 2016/17).

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The START fund provides an annual report that includes the amount of funding going directly for implementation by national and local partners. The DEPP partners (14 projects) report quarterly on progress and the overall outputs and outcomes of the programme are recorded and assessed in a logframe and a yearly public annual report. HLA also reports quarterly and annually on progress. IFRC reports annually against its results framework.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Challenges include measuring the effects of, and ensuring the sustainability, of national and local capacity development programmes.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In 2017 the UK will be focusing on the continued development of the three programmes. The START Fund will continue to record funds being implemented by national and local actors, and the DEPP and HLA will continue to implement capacity development activities of national and local actors. DFID is also developing a new business case to provide continued support to the IFRC.

  • Cross cutting issues

    People-Centred Approach

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5A - Invest in local capacities

5B
Invest according to risk

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The humanitarian system still does not manage risk effectively, with climate change a global challenge that requires a global response. It’s one of the biggest threats to our national and economic security and we need to act now in order to avoid more detrimental and costly effects in the future. Accordingly, our recent Economic Development Strategy reiterates the UK’s commitment to helping countries, communities and individuals to manage risk and build resilience to the impacts of climate change, including through the use of insurance and other risk-finance schemes.

  • Achievements at a glance

    Over the last 5 years, UK climate finance investments in developing countries have supported 21 million people to cope with the effects of climate change, improved access to clean energy for 6.6 million people and reduced or avoided 4.9 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. This includes being a founding donor of several insurance initiatives, including African Risk Capacity, which pools risk regionally to offer lower-cost insurance and provides advice and assistance to governments around insurance and risk finance.

    The UK provides up to £500,000 over three years for an international, multi-stakeholder index for risk management (InfoRM).We use the index to support early warning and resource allocation processes. The two largest humanitarian donors, US and ECHO, are using INFORM to support the allocation of their budgets, meaning INFORM is influencing over £6.81 billion of humanitarian funding.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    We monitor international climate finance spend on a regular basis. In addition, we monitor use of the index for risk management (InfoRM), including a User Survey carried out in June 2016. The range of monthly users since the launch of the new website is between 4,800 to 6,900. 87% of respondents to the User Survey rated the content quality as good or excellent.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    In 2017, we will design a system to ensure that UK aid allocations are benchmarked against the risk of crises. By the 2020s we want the international system to generate $1 billion in one year to respond to disasters using insurance-based and government-led systems. We will work with the UK businesses to deliver this and use our stakeholder position in the IFIs to ensure they expand risk-based finance to countries most at risk.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Disaster Risk Reduction

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    4B - Anticipate, do not wait, for crises 5B - Invest according to risk

5C
Invest in stability

Individual Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The 2015 UK Strategic Defence & Security Review makes clear the central role of development assistance in addressing the great challenges of our time, including mass migration, modern slavery, disease and terrorism. The achievement of development results alone is insufficient to reduce instability and violence and, in addition, we need to make choices to help countries and communities to manage change peacefully. The UK has adopted an integrated approach to tackling instability, increasing well-targeted development assistance in fragile states and regions, and pushing for more effective performance of the UN and World Bank in these contexts.

  • Achievements at a glance

    The UK has committed to an increase of funding for the Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) from £1.033 billion in 2015/16 to over £1.3 billion by 2019/20, and are on track to reach this target. The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund works to strengthen peace and resilience in countries at risk of conflict and instability. It is intended to deliver a whole-of-government approach to conflict prevention, stabilisation and crisis response.

    In addition, DFID is implementing its Building Stability Framework across the organisation to ensure development programming addresses root causes of conflict. This means working in the right places, putting politics first, thinking and acting beyond the state, seeing stability through the whole portfolio and manage risk and return flexibly. This is complemented by the UK commitment to invest 50% of DFID's budget in fragile states and regions - which remains on track

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    The UK closely monitors CSSF spending and systems are in place to assess the amount of resources spent in fragile states and regions. We have so far met the annual milestones and are on track to achieve the target.

    Additionally, CSSF and DFID programming are subject to regular scrutiny, assessing progress against objectives of building stability. An example of this work is the mentioning and training of over 11,000 Lebanese soldiers in urban counter-terrorism by 2019. Teams are required to outline in their business plans how their overall portfolio will contribute to building stability more widely. This is assessed annually.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    Addressing the root causes of conflict requires significant behavioral and resource shifts. An unclear evidence bases lends itself to trial and error. Additional resources in more complex environments require greater safeguards, increased expertise and often higher management time.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    While implementation is ongoing within UK systems, we need to invest in developing the right capabilities and continue to build up the evidence of what works, including through case studies of our own programming. Simultaneously the UK has a key role to play in influencing partners to consider their own approaches and work closely with multilateral partners to improve their effectiveness in fragile states and regions.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Invest in stability', what would it be

    The biggest constraints on successful conflict prevention are fundamentally political and cannot be completely solved through institutional reforms or more money. To achieve lasting solutions and prevent crises in the future, bilateral and multilateral actors must seize opportunities to tackle underlying causes of conflict.

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    1C - Remain engaged and invest in stability 5C - Invest in stability

5D
Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    Multi-year planning and funding is rapidly becoming the the default approach for UK humanitarian support in protracted crises. As part of the Grand Bargain, the UK is committed to increase multi-year, multi-partner funding in protracted and recurrent crises.

  • Achievements at a glance

    A number of DFID country offices, including Syria and Yemen, are developing new multi-year business cases aligning with the core funded business cases, using indicators tracking the same Grand Bargain commitments. The UK played a leading role in securing an additional $2 billion to support low income refugee hosting countries through the World Bank International Development Association (IDA)-18 replenishment.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    We are currently establishing how we can better track multi-year humanitarian commitments through DFID systems. IDA-18’s implementation will be monitored by a Result Measurement System and a Mid-Term Review, which we expect to include an assessment on the refugee sub-window.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    No major challenges

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    A focus for DFID’s proposed core funding business cases will be to promote multi-year funding by UN agencies to implementing partners as part of fulfilling agency commitments under the Grand Bargain.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing', what would it be

    Systematic and radical change is needed to reform the international humanitarian response to protracted crises and displacement. We are clear that the provision of short-term life-saving humanitarian aid must be complemented by longer-term interventions to meet the long-term needs.

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financing 5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

5E
Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency

Individual Commitment

Core Commitment

  • What led your organization to make the commitment?

    The findings of the High Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing, published in January 2016 highlighted the need for the humanitarian system to (i) shrink needs; (ii) broaden the resource base and (iii) improve delivery. The UK supports the Panel's analysis and has sought to adopt the Report's recommendations in its operations and policy.

  • Achievements at a glance

    - The UK is committed to the Grand Bargain (GB) to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of humanitarian assistance. DFID is aligning its humanitarian financing with the GB agenda for finance and system reform - both at country and headquarters - to support the multilateral system to work together more effectively.

    - The UK funds civil society consortia, such as the START network, to support local and national responders, as well as providing core funding to the IFRC Secretariat.

    - The UK has played a leading role in securing agreement on the new regional sub-window for refugees in IDA 18, as well as contributing £80m of support to the Ethiopia jobs compact, announced at the US Leader's Refugee Summit in September 2016.

  • How is your organization assessing progress

    - We are completing an internal review to assess our approach in protracted conflict and refugee settings, the outcomes of which will be shared.
    - We are setting baselines and establishing markers for those GB areas where we have made quantitative targets, eg cash, multiyear. Once finalised, we will be able to track progress over time.
    - We are working with GB champions to agree approaches to delivering shared GB commitments, eg results reporting and needs assessment. Once these have been agreed, we will establish markers to track progress.
    - Our programmes with civil society and the IFRC report annually.

  • Challenges faced in implementation

    The Grand Bargain sets an ambitious agenda for reform which requires all parties to make changes to their operations.

  • Next step to advance implementation in 2017

    - To continue UK efforts to deliver on GB commitments and tracki how UK support is delivered in line with the GB commitments - eg, based on impartial and high quality needs assessments. DFID country programmes will continue to deliver multi-year funding and provide unearmarked funding through country-based pooled funds.
    - The UK is exploring how we can encourage greater use of risk-based instruments to reduce the need for humanitarian assistance.
    - The UK will continue to work with both humanitarian and development partners to improve the support provided to people trapped by protracted crises.

  • If you had one message for the annual report on what is most needed to advance the transformation 'Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency', what would it be

    All partners need to focus on how the system should be reformed to ensure limited resources are used to best effect to meet the needs of affected people.

  • Cross cutting issues

    Country Based Pooled Funds

  • Specific initiatives

    The Grand Bargain

  • Other related Agenda for Humanity transformations

    5A - Invest in local capacities 5B - Invest according to risk 5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiency