Entity typeEntity regionCore responsibilityAgenda for humanity transormationAchivement to dateChallanges faced in implementationSignificant challengeOne message for advancementCross cutting issuesSocial initiatives
Member StateAsia-PacificInvest in Humanity5A - Invest in local capacitiesSome of Australia's achievements include: - Funding the Australian Red Cross (AU$36.5 million from 2015-19), Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AU$50 million from 2016-21) and Australian NGO Cooperation Program to strengthen preparedness and response capacity of NGOs and government and build resilience of Indo-Pacific countries. - Funding a Humanitarian Leadership Program managed by Save the Children and Deakin University that trains Pacific humanitarian officials. - Funding the IPPF to manage the SPRINT initiative, which builds the capacity of national governments to integrate sexual and reproductive health (SRH) into disaster management policies, and builds the capacity of local NGOs as first responders to provide vulnerable women, men and children with lifesaving SRH services. - Pre-positioning Australian Civilian Corps disaster risk management specialists in disaster management agencies in Vanuatu, Samoa, Fiji and Tonga, and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).- The current global definition of localisation is too narrow and fails to capture Australia's significant localisation activities. - Broadening understanding of Australia’s commitment to reform - transfer decision-making and leadership of humanitarian action to local and national actors. - Measurement of localisation of humanitarian assistance requires multiple perspectives and a holistic, integrated and qualitative approach.Australia will effectively build the capacity of national governments, civil society and local communities to prepare for and respond to disaster. Australia will adopt a differentiated approach to humanitarian localisation according to context. Australia will work with the Humanitarian Advisory Group, Australian Red Cross, Pacific states and other stakeholders on a regional definition of localisation. Australia will advocate for localisation with its partners, and will form partnerships with national and international organisations and agencies to support humanitarian localisation Where it makes sense and informed by due diligence and public financial management assessments, then Australia seeks to use country systems, consistent with international commitments.For Australia, localisation means recognising, respecting and strengthening leadership and decision-making by national actors in humanitarian action, in order to better address the needs of affected populations.Accountability to affected people, Country Based Pooled Funds, Disaster Risk Reduction, GenderThe Grand Bargain
Member StateAsia-PacificChange People's Lives: From Delivering Aid to Ending Need4A - Reinforce, do not replace, national and local systemsSome of Australia's achievements include: - Funding the Australian Red Cross (AU$36.5 million from 2015-19), Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AU$50 million from 2016-21) and Australian NGO Cooperation Program to strengthen preparedness and response capacity of NGOs and government and build resilience of Indo-Pacific countries. - Funding a Humanitarian Leadership Program managed by Save the Children and Deakin University that trains Pacific humanitarian officials. - Funding the IPPF to manage the SPRINT initiative, which builds the capacity of national governments to integrate sexual and reproductive health (SRH) into disaster management policies, and builds the capacity of local NGOs as first responders to provide vulnerable women, men and children with lifesaving SRH services. - Pre-positioning Australian Civilian Corps disaster risk management specialists in disaster management agencies in Vanuatu, Samoa, Fiji and Tonga, and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).- The current global definition of localisation is too narrow and fails to capture Australia's significant localisation activities. - Broadening understanding of Australia’s commitment to reform - transfer decision-making and leadership of humanitarian action to local and national actors. - Measurement of localisation of humanitarian assistance requires multiple perspectives and a holistic, integrated and qualitative approach.Australia will adopt a differentiated approach to humanitarian localisation according to context. Australia will continue to invest in country based pooled funds. Australia will work with the Humanitarian Advisory Group, Australian Red Cross, Pacific states and other stakeholders on a regional definition of localisation. Australia will advocate for localisation with its partners, and will form partnerships with national and international organisations and agencies to support humanitarian localisation. Where it makes sense and informed by due diligence and public financial management assessments, Australia seeks to use country systems, consistent with international commitments.For Australia, localisation means recognizing, respecting and strengthening leadership and decision-making by national actors in humanitarian action, in order to better address the needs of affected populations.Accountability to affected people, Country Based Pooled Funds, Disaster Risk Reduction, GenderThe Grand Bargain
Member StateAsia-PacificLeave No One Behind3A - Reduce and address displacementSince 1 July 2015, Australia has granted visas to over 22,000 people displaced by conflict in Syria and Iraq. In 2016, Australia also committed AU$130 million over the next three years to address the needs of forcibly displaced people globally, including a 25% increase in core unearmarked funding to UNHCR (AU$75 million); AU$45 million to support refugees and displaced populations and host communities in Afghanistan and Pakistan; and AU$10 million to the UN Peacebuilding Fund to address the causes of conflict. Australia provided a further AU$10 million to WFP to support displaced populations in Afghanistan. Building on the objectives of the Jordan and Lebanon Compacts, Australia finalised the design of our three-year AU$220 million Syria humanitarian package, including a resilience focus on education and livelihoods in Jordan and Lebanon. Australia provided direct support to UNHCR and IOM for their role in developing the Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees.No major obstacles encountered.In 2017, Australia will conclude multi-year funding agreements with some of our key humanitarian partners, including UNHCR. These will include specific multi-year commitments to provide core unearmarked funding - in return for multi-year strategic planning and ensuring multi-year funding is passed onto implementing partners as well. Implementation of our Syria package will be ongoing in 2017, and we will continue to engage in the development of the Global Compacts, including through direct support to UNHCR and IOM. Australia will continue to provide high levels of resettlement with places increasing from 13,750 in 2016-17 to 16,250 in 2017-18.Internal Displacement, RefugeesPlatform on Disaster Displacement
Member StateAsia-PacificLeave No One Behind3G - Address other groups or minorities in crisis settingsAustralia was proud to champion the Charter for Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action (The Charter) at the World Humanitarian Summit. Together with New Zealand, Australia has developed a new Monitoring and Evaluation Framework for humanitarian responses to rapid onset disasters in the Pacific. The framework emphasizes the importance of ensuring all data collected is disaggregated by sex, age and ability. The new Australian Humanitarian Partnership enables the Australian Government and six Australian NGOs to respond to humanitarian crises globally and to support local Pacific communities to take a leadership role in preparedness, risk reduction and resilience efforts. A key priority across the partnership is elevating the role of people with disability in decision-making.Australia requests all data submitted by partners to be disaggregated by sex, age and disability to ensure we can assess the gender equality and social inclusion dimensions of our responses. Collecting and verifying data can be challenging in a crisis.Australia will advocate for the Charter, and will aim to ensure that people with a range of abilities are active participants in the planning, design and implementation of humanitarian assistance. Australia will also support work to strengthen data collection and analysis prior, during and after situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies to better track and improve the situation of people with disabilities. In 2017–18, Australia will build global capacity to collect and analyse disability data through our disability data partnerships with UN Statistical Division, UNICEF, and the UN Washington Group on Disability Statistics.Programming that makes people with a diverse range of disabilities active participants in planning, design and implementation can empower people with disabilities to access to humanitarian assistance on an equal basis with others.Disability, People-Centred ApproachCharter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action
Member StateAsia-PacificInvest in Humanity5D - Finance outcomes, not fragmentation: shift from funding to financingAustralia is already a significant provider of core funding for humanitarian organisations. In 2016 Australia was the 4th largest unearmarked funding donor to UNOCHA (82% of Australia's total funding is unearmarked); the 11th largest funder of ICRC overall and 5th largest funder for unearmarked; 12th largest funder to the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF); and 12th largest core funder to UNHCR. Australia’s major multi-year partnerships with multilaterals all have significant unearmarked funding and rely on standard reporting, making them highly efficient both for the agency we are supporting and in terms of internal management overheads. Australia continues to support country-based pooled funds (CBPF). Australia committed AU$220 million over three years to respond to the Syria crisis. The package includes humanitarian funding to Syria, Jordan and Lebanon; and education, small-scale livelihoods and innovative pilot projects to support Syrian refugees and host communities. Australia funded the Australian Red Cross (AU$36.5 million from 2015-19).Recent donor earmarking trends have damaging effects on smaller donors like Australia who are left paying for agencies’ less attractive administrative costs. The visibility of core funding support is a priority for Australia to support our case to political decision-makers, and to be helpful for our government in order to be in a position to increase flexibility of humanitarian funding. A move towards a transparent methodology for allocation of core resources would be helpful to increase flexibility of humanitarian funding.Australia is continuing to demonstrate its commitment to core funding of partner agencies, expanding to multi-year commitments. Australia will finalize new multiyear agreements with CERF, UNHCR and ICRC. Australia is developing multiyear planning to respond to other humanitarian crises in Africa, Middle East and Asia.The CERF and country-based pooled funds are indispensable to coordinated delivery of life-saving assistance – whether it is responding rapidly to immediate need, or providing critical support to underfunded crises. Australia’s multi-year contribution to the CERF reflects our commitment to delivering humanitarian assistance through the most effective and efficient means.Central Emergency Response Fund, Country Based Pooled FundsNew Way of Working, The Grand Bargain
Member StateAsia-PacificChange People's Lives: From Delivering Aid to Ending Need4C - Deliver collective outcomes: transcend humanitarian-development dividesThe new DFAT Humanitarian Strategy commits to further support the transition from humanitarian relief to longer-term recovery and development: - It prioritizes early recovery efforts to resuscitate basic services (health, education and infrastructure), markets and livelihoods, and protecting the vulnerable, immediately after a disaster or crisis; and - Will provide technical assistance to partner organisations and governments to assist early recovery efforts; including exploring the option of seconding specialist DFAT staff and/or members for the Australian Civilian Corps to the Early Recovery Cluster (and others) to enhance the timely recovery of the affected country. Australia committed AU$220 million over three years to respond to the Syria crisis. The package includes humanitarian funding to Syria, Jordan and Lebanon; and education, small-scale livelihoods and innovative pilot projects to support Syrian refugees and host communities.DFAT's early recovery investments will help to localise a post-crisis response by empowering local actors, including women and children, people with disabilities and other marginalised and vulnerable groups and supporting the local private sector, particularly small to medium enterprises, to get back on its feet. FRANZ (France and New Zealand partners) will continue to support long-term resilience building activities. DFAT will develop guidance notes to assist DFAT Country Programs and Partners to implement key components of the Humanitarian Strategy. DFAT will continue to fund evaluations on the effectiveness of Australia's humanitarian responses.Innovation, Refugees, Social ProtectionThe Grand Bargain
Member StateAsia-PacificInvest in Humanity5E - Diversify the resource base and increase cost-efficiencyAustralia has committed to increase cash-based transfers as a humanitarian option, as appropriate based on case-by-case analysis. In the Pacific, the delivery of cash transfers to crisis and disaster-affected populations has mostly been small scale, although there are examples following Tropical Cyclones Winston, Pam and Evan. DFAT funded two assessments (Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Australia's Response to Cyclone Pam and Cash Transfer Programming in the Pacific: A Feasibility Scoping Study) which had a focus on cash in our recent regional humanitarian responses. The Tropical Cyclone Winston impact evaluation dispels concerns that money will be ‘misspent’.DFAT aid management systems are currently limited in their capacity to capture cash programming, this will be improved in 2017. The above DFAT funded reports found: generalizing feasibility is fraught due to the uniqueness of each country and the nuances between islands and rural urban differences; and there is an immediate need to invest in baseline information on market supply chains and performance and to make this information available to decision makers. Both reports show that cash based assistance is not only feasible, it is already featuring in responses. However, outside of Fiji, it is very much in its infancy, and there is little evidence of preparedness or planning incorporating the use of cash.Australia will continue to draw on evidence, lessons learned and global good practice concerning the use of cash transfers in humanitarian situations to build the resilience of communities and markets in our region. DFAT will work with its partners, including the private sector, to consider cash transfer programming as an appropriate humanitarian response option and when relevant, aim to provide cash transfers at scale.Cash, People-Centred Approach, Private Sector, Social ProtectionCharter for Change, The Grand Bargain
Member StateAsia-PacificLeave No One Behind3D - Empower and protect women and girlsAustralia’s Humanitarian Strategy (2016) includes a number of guiding principles aimed at protecting people and reducing violence against women. In partnership with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Australia supports the prepositioning of sexual and reproductive health, and gender based violence supplies in disaster-prone countries across the Indo-Pacific region. Australia also funds International Planned Parenthood Foundation (IPPF) to deliver the Sexual and Reproductive Health Program in Crisis and Post-Crisis Settings (SPRINT initiative), which aims to improve national capacity and implementation of sexual and reproductive health services in humanitarian crises. By the end of 2016, SPRINT had responded to 71 humanitarian crises and reached over 890,000 people with crucial services, including in response to recent disasters in Solomon Islands and Fiji in 2016.Australia requests all data submitted by partners to be disaggregated by sex, age and disability to ensure we can assess the gender equality and social inclusion dimensions of our responses. Collecting and verifying data can be challenging in a crisis. We will continue to work with partners to implement gender-sensitive humanitarian programming, recognising the additional risk of physical, sexual and other forms of violence facing women and girls with disabilities. Australia has committed to apply a Gender Marker of 80 percent to all humanitarian funding provided by the Australian Government – to ensure that gender issues are considered at all stages of the program cycle. Australia will continue to support work to strengthen data collection and analysis prior, during and after situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies to better track and improve responses.Ensure that women are well represented in leadership roles, decision making, planning and evaluation at all levels. Support capacity building of women’s leadership and address underlying barriers to participation. Accountability to affected people, Disability, Gender, Social ProtectionCharter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, Commitment to Action: Transcending the humanitarian - development divide